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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors:
T. Pócs
,
J. G. Graham
,
M. von Konrat
, and
J. Larraín

Enumeration and distributional data of 28 liverworts new to Peru are presented, accompanied by taxonomic annotations, phytogeographical evaluation and illustrations. Remarkable new Peruvian records include the very rare northern Andean endemic Platycaulis renifolia as well as Frullania pearceana, hitherto known only from its type locality in Bolivia. Oil bodies are described for the first time in the genus Platycaulis and male branches are newly observed in Radula yanoella, a species hitherto known only in sterile state.

Open access
Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors:
J. Csiky
,
L. Balogh
,
I. Dancza
,
F. Gyulai
,
G. Jakab
,
G. Király
,
É. Lehoczky
,
A. Mesterházy
,
P. Pósa
, and
T. Wirth

As part of the PADAPT project, the authors compiled the invasion biological database of the alien vascular flora of Hungary, which contains the nativeness, residence time, introduc- tion mode and invasion status of 878 alien or cryptogenic taxa. In the absence of adequate evidence, the classification of some species was only possible into uncertain, transitional cat- egories. The definitions of most categories are compatible with several international termi- nologies, but are primarily based on Central European traditions. Of the 560 taxa that have already been naturalised in Hungary, 85 are invasive, and 22 of them are transformer alien vascular plants. Only 5 of these transformers are included in the European list of Invasive Alien Species of Union concern (Ailanthus altissima, Asclepias syriaca, Elodea nuttallii, Heracleum mantegazzianum and H. sosnowskyi), which require uniform preventive interventions and treatments throughout the continent, while the rest of transformers in Hungary (e.g., Robinia pseudoacacia, Fallopia × bohemica and Solidago gigantea) draw attention to the unique, local and/ or regional invasion biological situation of the Pannonian Basin and Central Europe.

Open access