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Inclusion of Gaming Disorder in ICD has more advantages than disadvantages

Commentary on: Scholars’ open debate paper on the World Health Organization ICD-11 Gaming Disorder proposal (Aarseth et al.)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Orsolya Király
and
Zsolt Demetrovics

This paper is a response to a recent debate paper in which Aarseth et al. argue that the inclusion of a formal diagnosis and categories for problematic video gaming or Gaming Disorder (GD) in the World Health Organization’s 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) is premature and therefore the proposal should be removed. The present authors systematically address all the six main arguments presented by Aarseth et al. and argue that, even though some of the concerns presented in the debate paper are legitimate, the inclusion of GD in ICD-11 has more advantages than disadvantages. Furthermore, the present authors also argue that the two GD subtypes (“GD, predominantly online” and “GD, predominantly offline”) are unnecessary and rather problematic; the main category for GD would be perfectly sufficient.

Open access

Addiktológiai pszichológia Magyarországon: az elmúlt 30 év áttekintése

Addiction Psychology in Hungary: A Review of the Past 30 Years

Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle
Authors:
Zsolt Demetrovics
and
József Rácz

A tanulmány célja az addiktológiai szakterület elmúlt harminc-negyven évének áttekintése, a legfontosabb fejlemények, kutatási területek és eredmények összefoglaló bemutatása. A szerzők az addiktológiai pszichológia történetében három fázist azonosítanak. A 80-as évek kezdeti törekvéseit a 90-es évek közepétől a szakterületjelentős megerősödése és hazai kibontakozása követte, míg a 2000-es évek második felétől már a nemzetközi jelenlét a meghatározó. A történeti összefoglalót követően a szerzők az egyes meghatározó kutatócsoportokat és kutatási irányokat mutatják be, majd a legfontosabb szakmai közéleti fejleményeket ismertetik.

The current review aims to summarise the history of the past thirty to forty years of the addiction field in Hungary and present a summary of the major developments, research fields, and scientific results. The authors identify three phases in the history of Hungarian addiction science. The initial aspirations of the 1980s were followed by a significant strengthening and development of the field.from the mid-1990s. This, however, mainly happened within Hungary, while in the next decade, from the second half of the 2000s, the international presence of the Hungarian addiction research field became more significant. Following the historical summary, the authors present the major research teams and research directions and describe the main policy developments.

Open access

Commentary on: Are we overpathologizing everyday life? A tenable blueprint for behavioral addiction research

The diagnostic pitfalls of surveys: If you score positive on a test of addiction, you still have a good chance not to be addicted

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Aniko Maraz
,
Orsolya Király
, and
Zsolt Demetrovics

Background and Aims

Survey-based studies often fail to take into account the predictive value of a test, in other words, the probability of a person having (or not having) the disease when scoring positive (or negative) on the given screening test.

Methods

We re-visited the theory and basic calculations of diagnostic accuracy.

Results

In general, the lower the prevalence the worse the predictive value is. When the disorder is relatively rare, a positive test finding is typically not useful in confirming its presence given the high proportion of false positive cases. For example, using the Compulsive Buying Scale (Faber & O’Guinn, 1992) three in four people classified as having compulsive buying disorder will in fact not have the disorder.

Conclusions

Screening tests are limited to serve as an early detection “gate” and only clinical (interview-based) studies are suitable to claim that a certain behaviour is truly “pathological”.

Open access

Background and aims

Celebrity worship, defined as an obsessive fascination with a famous person, has been associated with several mental health problems, such as symptoms of depression and anxiety, dissociation, and body image concerns. The aim of this study was to extend the scope of investigation of previous research on psychological correlates by exploring the association of celebrity worship with compulsive behaviors, such as problematic Internet use, maladaptive daydreaming, desire for fame, and self-efficacy.

Methods

A voluntary sample of 437 Hungarian adolescents and adults (78.3% male; M age = 24.7 years, SD = 7.4) completed an online questionnaire focusing on attitudes toward celebrities and other relevant variables.

Results

As a result of hierarchical regression analyses, high levels of celebrity worship were associated with problematic Internet use, maladaptive daydreaming, and desire for fame. Furthermore, females were at higher risk to become obsessed with celebrities than males.

Discussion and conclusion

These findings provide with a more comprehensive picture of psychological difficulties associated with celebrity worship and may contribute to a better understanding of this phenomenon.

Open access