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-011-0019-1 McGovern , P. E. ( 2003 ). Ancient wine: The search for the origins of viniculture . Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press . Meesters , R

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Countries . European Central Bank, Working Paper Series , No. 1129 . Angrist , J. – Pischke , J. S. ( 2009 ): Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion . Princeton : Princeton University Press . 10.1515/9781400829828 Asea , P. K

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: Princeton University Press . Dorn , A. J. , Dorn , D. , & Sengmueller , P. ( 2014

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: A very short introduction . Oxford : Oxford University Press . 10.1093/actrade/9780199584529.001.0001 Eliade , M . ( 1964 ). Shamanism: Archaic techniques of ecstasy . Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press . Eliade , M . ( 1982 ). A

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.-P. ( 2016 ): The Euro and the Battle of Ideas . Princeton : Princeton University Press . 10.2307/j.ctvc774qh Buchanan , J. M. ( 1987 ): Moral Community, Moral Order, or Moral Anarchy . In: Buchanan , J. M. (eds): Economics: Between Predictive

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Gábor Orosz, Mária Benyó, Bernadett Berkes, Edina Nikoletti, Éva Gál, István Tóth-Király, and Beáta Bőthe

.1177/2050157916664559 Rosenberg , M. ( 1965 ). Society and the adolescent self-image . Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press . 10.1515/9781400876136 Ryan , R

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, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1995), 155-156. 15 See Bartók’s letter to his wife, 5 September 1918, Bartók Béla családi levelei [Béla Bartók family letters], ed. by Béla BARTÓK, Jr. (Budapest: Zeneműkiadó, 1981), 282. The early stages of composition

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( Nomos 1998 ) 231 – 47 . Schuessler , A. A. , A Logic of Expressive Choice ( Princeton University Press 2000 ). 10.1515/9780691222417 Seiler , Ch. , ‘Entwicklung der Bevölkerung und Familienpolitik’ in Isensee , Josef. and Kirchhof , Paul

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Journal of Psychedelic Studies
Authors: Robert Beckstead, Bryce Blankenagel, Cody Noconi, and Michael Winkelman

Historical documents relating to early Mormonism suggest that Joseph Smith (1805–1844) employed entheogen-infused sacraments to fulfill his promise that every Mormon convert would experience visions of God and spiritual ecstasies. Early Mormon scriptures and Smith’s teachings contain descriptions consistent with using entheogenic material. Compiled descriptions of Joseph Smith’s earliest visions and early Mormon convert visions reveal the internal symptomology and outward bodily manifestations consistent with using an anticholinergic entheogen. Due to embarrassing symptomology associated with these manifestations, Smith sought for psychoactives with fewer associated outward manifestations. The visionary period of early Mormonism fueled by entheogens played a significant role in the spectacular rise of this American-born religion. The death of Joseph Smith marked the end of visionary Mormonism and the failure or refusal of his successor to utilize entheogens as a part of religious worship. The implications of an entheogenic origin of Mormonism may contribute to the broader discussion of the major world religions with evidence of entheogen use at their foundation and illustrate the value of entheogens in religious experience.

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