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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Espen Aarseth
,
Anthony M. Bean
,
Huub Boonen
,
Michelle Colder Carras
,
Mark Coulson
,
Dimitri Das
,
Jory Deleuze
,
Elza Dunkels
,
Johan Edman
,
Christopher J. Ferguson
,
Maria C. Haagsma
,
Karin Helmersson Bergmark
,
Zaheer Hussain
,
Jeroen Jansz
,
Daniel Kardefelt-Winther
,
Lawrence Kutner
,
Patrick Markey
,
Rune Kristian Lundedal Nielsen
,
Nicole Prause
,
Andrew Przybylski
,
Thorsten Quandt
,
Adriano Schimmenti
,
Vladan Starcevic
,
Gabrielle Stutman
,
Jan Van Looy
, and
Antonius J. Van Rooij

research base is low . The field is fraught with multiple controversies and confusions and there is, in fact, no consensus position among scholars. This is indicated by a recent publication on “Internet Gaming Disorder” in the journal Addiction ( Griffiths

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psychiatric nosology. More recently, she turned her attention to Internet gaming disorder, another behavioral addiction that is likely to be included in the next revision of the DSM-5. Once again, Nancy was ahead of the curve. She convened an international

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computer-based internet gaming disorder ( Lin et al., 2016 ). On the other hand, problematic smartphone users overlap with some individuals with non-mobile internet addiction ( Liu, Lin, Pan, & Lin, 2016; Pan, Chiu, & Lin, 2019 ). Smartphone addiction and

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-March ( GWI, 2020 ). Most recent assessment tools are based on the diagnostic criteria for the Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) – a “condition warranting more clinical research and experience” in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 (DSM-5

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behaviors include pathological gambling (PG), internet gaming disorder (IGD), mobile phone addiction, shopping addictions, and sex addiction, among others. Although numerous similarities exist between substance use disorder (SUD) and BA, the Diagnostic and

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et al., 2022 ). Problematic gaming in its most severe form has been recognized as Internet gaming disorder (IGD), defined as the uncontrollable, excessive, and compulsive use of online games, resulting in significant impairment or distress in daily

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has nonetheless been shown to manifest as an addictive behavior that can have life-altering consequences for the player in their social and work lives ( Baer, Saran, & Green, 2012 ; Griffiths & Meredith, 2009 ). Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) was

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Clémence Cabelguen
,
Bruno Rocher
,
Juliette Leboucher
,
Benoît Schreck
,
Gaëlle Challet-Bouju
,
Jean-Benoît Hardouin
, and
Marie Grall-Bronnec

Introduction In 2013, internet gaming disorder (IGD) was integrated into the 5 th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) ( American Psychiatric Association, 2013 ). Since June 2018, the World Health

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Igor J. Pietkiewicz
,
Szymon Nęcki
,
Anna Bańbura
, and
Radosław Tomalski

Internet gaming disorder, and recommend further research into excessive use of social media or viewing pornography ( American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013 ). Internet gaming may involve role-playing games (RPGs) or live action RPG in which

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of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) was published in 2013, it included Internet gaming disorder (IGD) in the chapter ‘Conditions for further study’ ( American Psychiatric Association, 2013 ). IGD is defined as

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