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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Lijuan Shi, Yuanyuan Wang, Hui Yu, Amanda Wilson, Stephanie Cook, Zhizhou Duan, Ke Peng, Zhishan Hu, Jianjun Ou, Suqian Duan, Yuan Yang, Jiayu Ge, Hongyan Wang, Li Chen, Kaihong Zhao, and Runsen Chen

addiction symptoms among late adolescents: A moderated mediation analysis . Addictive Behaviors , 64 , 314 – 320 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.11.002 . 10.1016/j.addbeh.2015

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Seung-Yup Lee, Donghwan Lee, Cho Rong Nam, Da Yea Kim, Sera Park, Jun-Gun Kwon, Yong-Sil Kweon, Youngjo Lee, Dai Jin Kim, and Jung-Seok Choi

Interclass comparisons of the male subgroups showed similar results to those of the whole-group model. The dual-problem group displayed more severe psychopathology and addictive behaviors than the problematic Internet and the healthy groups (Table  5 ). The

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-irrelevant cues is inappropriate in this case. Addiction-irrelevant cues should not elicit an urge to perform the addictive behavior and this would lead to an overestimation of effect size Coding of

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Attila Körmendi, Zita Brutóczki, Bianka Petra Végh, and Rita Székely

lessons, or while having her meals. Availability is a cardinal key in the inchoative stage of addictions, as it increases the probability of the development of addictive behavior. Furthermore, there are believed to be some psychological problems

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-watching without considering it a priori as an addictive behavior ( Billieux et al., 2015 ; Kardefelt-Winther et al., 2017 ). Qualitatively exploring the phenomenon, themes, and views expressed through the focus group approach allowed us to point out the inherent

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Inclusion of gaming disorder in the diagnostic classifications and promotion of public health response

Commentary to the “Scholars’ open debate paper on the World Health Organization ICD-11 Gaming Disorder proposal”: A perspective from Iran

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Behrang Shadloo, Rabert Farnam, Masoumeh Amin-Esmaeili, Marziyeh Hamzehzadeh, Hosein Rafiemanesh, Maral Mardaneh Jobehdar, Kamyar Ghani, Nader Charkhgard, and Afarin Rahimi-Movaghar

There are ongoing controversies regarding the upcoming ICD-11 concept of gaming disorder. Recently, Aarseth et al. have put this diagnostic entity into scrutiny. Although we, a group of Iranian researchers and clinicians, acknowledge some of Aarseth et al.’s concerns, believe that the inclusion of gaming disorder in the upcoming ICD-11 would facilitate necessary steps to raise public awareness, enhance development of proper diagnostic approaches and treatment interventions, and improve health and non-health policies.

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, but not disorders due to substance use or addictive behaviors. The early estimations of prevalence rates of CSBD provided by Carnes ( 1991 ) and Coleman ( 1992 ) suggested that up to 6% of people from the general population suffer from

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Csilla Ágoston and Attila Körmendi

Hayes, S. C. & Levin, M. E. (2012). Mindfulness and acceptance for addictive behaviors: Applying contextual CBT to substance abuse and behavioral addictions . Oakland, CA: New Harbinger

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This commentary supports the argument that there is an increasing tendency to subsume a range of excessive daily behaviors under the rubric of non-substance related behavioral addictions. The concept of behavioral addictions gained momentum in the 1990s with the recent reclassification of pathological gambling as a non-substance behavioral addiction in DSM-5 accelerating this process. The propensity to label a host of normal behaviors carried out to excess as pathological based simply on phenomenological similarities to addictive disorders will ultimately undermine the credibility of behavioral addiction as a valid construct. From a scientific perspective, anecdotal observation followed by the subsequent modification of the wording of existing substance dependence diagnostic criteria, and then searching for biopsychosocial correlates to justify classifying an excessive behavior resulting in harm as an addiction falls far short of accepted taxonomic standards. The differentiation of normal from non-substance addictive behaviors ought to be grounded in sound conceptual, theoretical and empirical methodologies. There are other more parsimonious explanations accounting for such behaviors. Consideration needs to be given to excluding the possibility that excessive behaviors are due to situational environmental/social factors, or symptomatic of an existing affective disorder such as depression or personality traits characteristic of cluster B personalities (namely, impulsivity) rather than the advocating for the establishment of new disorders.

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Robert F. Leeman PhD, Julie A. Patock-Peckham, Rani A. Hoff, Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin, Marvin A. Steinberg, Loreen J. Rugle, and Marc N. Potenza

Characteristics of adolescent past-year gamblers and non-gamblers in relation to alcohol drinking Addictive Behaviors 32 80 89 . K D

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