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Abstract  

This paper focuses on the study of self-citations at the meso and micro (individual) levels, on the basis of an analysis of the production (1994–2004) of individual researchers working at the Spanish CSIC in the areas of Biology and Biomedicine and Material Sciences. Two different types of self-citations are described: author self-citations (citations received from the author him/herself) and co-author self-citations (citations received from the researchers’ co-authors but without his/her participation). Self-citations do not play a decisive role in the high citation scores of documents either at the individual or at the meso level, which are mainly due to external citations. At micro-level, the percentage of self-citations does not change by professional rank or age, but differences in the relative weight of author and co-author self-citations have been found. The percentage of co-author self-citations tends to decrease with age and professional rank while the percentage of author self-citations shows the opposite trend. Suppressing author self-citations from citation counts to prevent overblown self-citation practices may result in a higher reduction of citation numbers of old scientists and, particularly, of those in the highest categories. Author and co-author self-citations provide valuable information on the scientific communication process, but external citations are the most relevant for evaluative purposes. As a final recommendation, studies considering self-citations at the individual level should make clear whether author or total self-citations are used as these can affect researchers differently.

Open access

Abstract  

This paper revisits an aspect of citation theory (i.e., citer motivation) with respect to the Mathematical Review system and the reviewer’s role in mathematics. We focus on a set of journal articles (369) published in Singularity Theory (1974–2003), the mathematicians who wrote editorial reviews for these articles, and the number of citations each reviewed article received within a 5 year period. Our research hypothesis is that the cognitive authority of a high status reviewer plays a positive role in how well a new article is received and cited by others. Bibliometric evidence points to the contrary: Singularity Theorists of lower status (junior researchers) have reviewed slightly more well-cited articles (2–5 citations, excluding author self-citations) than their higher status counterparts (senior researchers). One explanation for this result is that lower status researchers may have been asked to review ‘trendy’ or more accessible parts of mathematics, which are easier to use and cite. We offer further explanations and discuss a number of implications for a theory of citation in mathematics. This research opens the door for comparisons to other editorial review systems, such as book reviews written in the social sciences or humanities.

Open access

-007-1777-2 . Glänzel , W , Thijs , B 2004 The influence of author self-citations on bibliometric macro indicators . Scientometrics 59 3 281 – 310 https://doi.org/10.1023/B:SCIE.0000018535.99885.e9 . Glänzel , W

Open access
Scientometrics
Authors:
Ludo Waltman
,
Nees Jan van Eck
,
Thed N. van Leeuwen
,
Martijn S. Visser
, and
Anthony F. J. van Raan

counted the number of times the publication had been cited by the end of each year between 1999 and 2008. Author self-citations are not included in our citation counts. For each subject category, the number of identified publications is listed in the

Open access
Scientometrics
Authors:
Reindert K. Buter
,
Ed. C. M. Noyons
, and
Anthony F. J. Van Raan

1995–2005 publications to WoS publications, but the cited publications were restricted to “articles”, “letters”, “notes” and “reviews” (the citing documents could be any type). Both author self-citations and journal self-citations were excluded. Author

Open access

. Glänzel , W. , Thijs , B. , Schlemmer , B. 2004 A bibliometric approach to the role of author self-citations in scientific communication . Scientometrics 59 1 63 – 77 10.1023/B:SCIE.0000013299.38210.74 . 9

Open access