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Abstract  

This paper introduces a new approach to detecting scientists’ field mobility by focusing on an author’s self-citation network, and the co-authorships and keywords in self-citing articles. Contrary to much previous literature on self-citations, we will show that author’s self-citation patterns reveal important information on the development and emergence of new research topics over time. More specifically, we will discuss self-citations as a means to detect scientists’ field mobility. We introduce a network based definition of field mobility, using the Optimal Percolation Method (Lambiotte & Ausloos, 2005; 2006). The results of the study can be extended to selfcitation networks of groups of authors and, generally also for other types of networks.

Open access

Abstract

I propose a new method (Pareto weights) to objectively attribute citations to co-authors. Previous methods either profess ignorance about the seniority of co-authors (egalitarian weights) or are based in an ad hoc way on the order of authors (rank weights). Pareto weights are based on the respective citation records of the co-authors. Pareto weights are proportional to the probability of observing the number of citations obtained. Assuming a Pareto distribution, such weights can be computed with a simple, closed-form equation but require a few iterations and data on a scholar, her co-authors, and her co-authors’ co-authors. The use of Pareto weights is illustrated with a group of prominent economists. In this case, Pareto weights are very different from rank weights. Pareto weights are more similar to egalitarian weights but can deviate up to a quarter in either direction (for reasons that are intuitive).

Open access
Scientometrics
Authors:
Thomas Gurney
,
Edwin Horlings
, and
Peter van den Besselaar

-data fields. The fields they used include co-authorships, affiliation addresses, citation relationships, title words, interval in years between publications, author country, citation and co-citation relationships. Data selection and

Open access

current year (contemporary h -index), reducing the effects of co-authorship (individual h -index), and adjusting the number of citations by the age of each publication (age-weighted citation rate). Some scholars posit that these metrics are complementary

Open access

research institute that insists on co-authorship of every paper produced in his/her institute may exceed these boundary conditions, but the analysis of honorary authorship are not in the focus of our study. The other parameters remained at their

Open access

, Thijs , B 2004 Does co-authorship inflate the share of self-citations? . Scientometrics 61 3 395 – 404 https://doi.org/10.1023/B:SCIE.0000045117.13348.b1 . Glänzel , W , Thijs , B , Schlemmer , B

Open access

. Leydesdorff , L , Sun , Y 2009 National and international dimensions of the triple helix in Japan: University-industry-government versus international co-authorship relations . Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 60 4 778

Open access