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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Ervin Albert, Rita Sipos, Szilárd Jánosi, Péter Kovács, Árpád Kenéz, Adrienn Micsinai, Zsófia Noszály, and Imre Biksi

., 2017 ). In Hungary, the last surveys on the matter were conducted in the 2000s. Kaszanyitzky et al. (2004) investigated more than 2,000 S. aureus (SA) isolates of livestock origin and detected only five MRSA strains, which were all from dairy

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infections, osteomyelitis, and endocarditis [ 1 ]. The mean prevalence of MRSA in Iran is between 57.2 and 93.3 percent [ 2 ]. Antibiotic misuse has led to high resistance levels in MRSA strains leading to an increased mortality rate, high costs of care and

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Hagen Frickmann, Thomas Köller, Ralf Matthias Hagen, Klaus-Peter Ebert, Martin Müller, Werner Wenzel, Renate Gatzer, Ulrich Schotte, Alfred Binder, Romy Skusa, Philipp Warnke, Andreas Podbielski, Christian Rückert, and Bernd Kreikemeyer

(Supplementary material 1). The spa typing for MRSA suggested clonal identity of two nonnosocomial MRSA strains from Syrian patient 5 from the Bundeswehr hospital Hamburg (HBG-S5) and Syrian patient 6 from the Bundeswehr hospital Westerstede (WEST-S6) (both t

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Hagen Frickmann, Andreas Hahn, Norbert Georg Schwarz, Ralf Matthias Hagen, Denise Dekker, Rebecca Hinz, Volker Micheel, Benedikt Hogan, Jürgen May, and Raphael Rakotozandrindrainy

Direct growth on blood and screening agar for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at a tropical surveillance site was compared with broth enrichment and subsequent growth on selective MRSA agar after international sample transport.

In Madagascar, 1548 swabs from an MRSA surveillance study were assessed for growth on Columbia blood agar enriched with 5% sheep blood and MRSA screening agar at the surveillance site with subsequent cold storage of the samples and shipment to Germany. In Germany, 1541 shipped samples were analyzed by non-selective broth enrichment with subsequent culture on MRSA selective agar.

A total of 28 MRSA isolates were detected. Of these, 20 strains were isolated from direct culture on blood and MRSA screening agars at the surveillance site, 24 MRSA strains were isolated using the broth enrichment method in Germany, and 16 MRSA strains were identified by both approaches.

In spite of the observed die-off of individual strains due to long-term storage and transport, broth enrichment with subsequent screening on MRSA selective agar after international sample shipment led to comparable sensitivity of MRSA detection like streaking on blood and MRSA agar at the tropical surveillance site.

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The use of vancomycin for treatment of serious infections caused by MRSA strains has resulted in emergence of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) in clinical settings. Following our previous report of phenotypic VRSA in Nigeria, the current study attempts to determine the genetic basis underlying this resistance. Over a period of 6 months, non-duplicate clinical S. aureus isolates from 73 consecutive patients with infective conditions at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Osogbo were tested against a panel of eight selected antibiotics by disk diffusion test. The Epsilom test strip was used to determine vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to amplify nuc, mecA, vanA, and vanB genes. Of 73 isolates, 61 (83.6%) had MIC of ≤2 μg/ml, 11 (15.1%) had 4–8 μg/ml and 1 (1.4%) had 16 μg/ml. The mecA gene was detected in 5 (6.8%) isolates but none contained vanA or vanB genes. Both vancomycin-susceptible and intermediate isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics, while the only vancomycin resistant isolate was resistant to all eight antibiotics. The result confirms the occurrence of phenotypic vancomycin intermediate-resistant S. aureus (VISA) and VRSA infections in Nigeria, but the molecular basis will require further investigation.

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(2010–2015) conducted in France, horses, dogs and cats were tested for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains. Of the 130 cases, 60% were found to be resistant to tetracyclines, 50% to gentamicin, 48.5% to enrofloxacin, 33.1% to erythromycin

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78 108 112 Ghebremedhin B, König B, Witte W, Hardy KJ, Hawkey PM, König B: Subtyping of ST22-MRSA-IV (Barnim epidemic MRSA strain) at a university

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reduce the infection rate in soldiers [ 13 ]. Next to military training camps, community-acquired MRSA strains were also infrequently (9 out of 67 [13.4%] total MRSA cases) observed in patients without identified risk factors in a US military hospital

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Biologia Futura
Authors: Gergely Sámuel Bartha, Gergő Tóth, Péter Horváth, Eszter Kiss, Nóra Papp, and Monika Kerényi

.g., vancomycin for MRSA strain) were used as a positive control in microdilution, and diluted DMSO solution was used as a negative control ( Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, 2012 ). Results AA I and AA II

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-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains for either compound. The lowest MICs of 128 mg/L were determined for capsaicin against Bacillus subtilis and for DHC against Enterococcus faecalis (strain ATCC 29523) [ 20 ]. In another in vitro study, six capsaicin

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