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Anglo-American and French, as well as German, Spanish and Hungarian variations to “Law and Literature” are surveyed for that as to the nature of the discipline some conclusions can be formulated. Accordingly, “Law and Literature” recalls that which is infinite in fallibility and which is not transparent in its simplicity, that is, the situation confronted that we may not avoid deciding about despite the fact that we may not get to a final understanding. What is said thereby is that “Law and Literature” is just a life-substitute. Like an artificial ersatz, it helps one to see out from what he/she cannot surpass. What it is all about is perhaps not simply bridging the gap between the law’s proposition and the case of law, with unavoidable tensions confronting the general and the individual, as well as the abstract and the concrete. Instead, it is more about live meditation, professional methodicalness stepped back in order to gain further perspectives and renewed reflection from a distance, so that the underlying reason for the legal (and especially judicial) profession can be recurrently rethought. In a fictional form, literature is the symbol and synonym of reflected life, a field where genuine human fates can be represented. Thereby, at the same time it is a substitute for theology, rooted in earthly existence as a supply to foster feeling kinds of, or substitutes to, transcendence.

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A fogyatékosság reprezentációja az általános iskolák magyar irodalom tananyagához kapcsolódó irodalmi művekben

Representation of Disability in Literary Works Related to the Hungarian Literature Curriculum of Primary Schools

Educatio
Authors: Nikoletta Mária Gulya and Anikó Fehérvári

Resistance. In: M. Corker & T. Shakespeare (eds) Disability/Postmodernity: Embodying Disability Theory. London, Bloomsbury. pp. 159–174. 16 Dyches, T

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