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blood culture materials. As early as at the beginning of the new millennium, small and in part poorly evaluated probe panels for the identification of blood culture pathogens were published [ 2 ], but insufficient standardization limited the

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Bacteria in Human Disease 1977 Washington JA II, Ilstrup DM: Blood cultures: issues and controversies. Rev Infect Dis 8, 792

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Weinstein MP, Murphy JR, Reller LB, Lichtenstein KA: The clinical significance of positive blood cultures: a comprehensive analysis of 500 episodes of bacteremia and fungemia in adults. II. Clinical observations

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We report the case of a nosocomial infection due to Enterococcus cecorum isolated from a blood culture of a 75-year-old septic male patient. Matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and Vitek 2 succeeded in identification of the isolate.

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Hematológia–Transzfuziológia
Authors: Dávid Sipos, Adrienn Nyul, Krisztina Kovács, Hussain Alizadeh, and Zoltán Péterfi

mellitus. 2017 Available from: https://www.uptodate.com/contents/susceptibility-to-infections-in-persons-with-diabetes-mellitus 5 Weinstein MP. Positive blood culture. Clin Adv Hematol Oncol. 2010

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From year to year, it is important to get an overview of the occurrence of causative agents in febrile neutropenic patients to determine the empiric treatment. Thus our aims were to evaluate a four-year period regarding the prevalence of bloodstream infections and the most important causative agents. During this period, 1,361 patients were treated in our hematology ward because of various hematological disorders. 812 febrile episodes were recorded in 469 patients. At that time, 3,714 blood culture (BC) bottles were sent for microbiological investigations, 759 of them gave positive signal. From the majority of positive blood culture bottles (67.1%), Gram-positive bacteria, mainly coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), were grown. Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from 32.9% of the positive blood culture bottles, in these cases the leading pathogen was Escherichia coli. The high prevalence of CNS was attributed to mainly contamination, while lower positivity rate for Gram-negative bacteria was associated with the use of broad-spectrum empiric antibiotic treatment.

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Hagen Frickmann, Kerstin Köller, Irina Veil, Mirjam Weise, Alicja Ludyga, Norbert Georg Schwarz, Philipp Warnke, and Andreas Podbielski

, 905 – 914 ( 2012 ) 30. Freeman JT , Chen LF , Sexton DJ , Anderson DJ : Blood culture contamination with Enterococci and skin organisms

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. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2015; 21: 337–343. 9 Bousquet A, Malfuson JV, Sanmartin N, et al. An 8-year survey of strains identified in blood cultures in a clinical haematology unit

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for anaerobic bacterial identification in clinical microbiology. Anaerobe 2018; 54: 191–196. 15 Opota O, Croxatto A, Prod’hom G, et al. Blood culture

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microbiological study was carried out at the Albert Szent-Györgyi Clinical Center, a tertiary-care teaching hospital in Szeged, Hungary. The study included S. maltophilia bacterial isolates from blood culture samples, respiratory samples and urine samples and

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