Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 105 items for :

  • "correlation analysis" x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All

average interest rates applied to banks' deposits at the Central Bank of Turkey. After presenting the simple correlation among the rates, we do a historical correlation analysis to observe the changes of correlations between the variables during the period

Open access

490 nm was determined by a microplate reader (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc.), the inhibitory rate (%) was finally calculated by the following formula: Inhibitory   rate ( % ) = OD Blank − OD Sample OD Blank × 100 % Correlation analysis Quantitative

Open access

.71 Note. SSQ: Social Support Questionnaire; CSEQ: Collective Self-Efficacy Questionnaire; SD : standard deviation. Correlation analysis The goal of our research was to examine the relationship

Open access

(48.3) Probable fatigue No (<4) 940(69.5) Yes (≥4) 412(30.5) Probable depression No (<10) 1,238(91.6) Yes (≥10) 114(8.4) Correlations among the variables The Pearson’s correlation analysis ( Table 2 ) showed that workaholism was positively correlated with stress

Open access

uses. The second research question (R2) could be inferred from the results of both bivariate correlation analysis as well as EGA results. The number of associations as well as effect sizes could indicate if PSU is driven by specific platform use. While

Open access
Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors: Yaprak Engin-Ustun, Emel Kiyak Caglayan, Mustafa Kara, Ayse Yesim Gocmen, M. Fevzi Polat, and Ayla Aktulay

Objective

Our aim was to determine how Ramadan fasting effects serum Human NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1/SIR2L1) and visfatin levels during pregnancy.

Materials and methods

Thirty-six patients were included in this case-control study. The patient group consisted of 18 pregnant women who were Ramadan fasting. Another healthy 18 pregnant women with matching pregnancy weeks and ages formed the control group. Blood samples were obtained from the patients for biochemical analyses and serum adipokine level measurements.

Results

The mean sirtuin and visfatin levels in fasting pregnant women were 2.87 ± 0.95 and 60.18 ± 19.49 ng/mL, respectively, while the mean serum sirtuin and visfatin levels in the control group was determined to be 4.28 ± 1.45 and 23.26 ± 6.18 ng/mL, respectively. A statistically significant difference was determined between the groups (p = 0.002, p = 0.0001). A correlation analysis provided a negative correlation between number of fasting days and sirtuin levels (r = 0.45, p = 0.005) and a positive correlation with visfatin levels (r = 0.73, p = 0.0001).

Conclusion

As a result, while the serum sirtuin 1 level of pregnant women decreased due to fasting in Ramadan, we determined that their visfatin levels increased and this increase was in correlation with the days of fasting.

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Engin Karadağ, Şule Betül Tosuntaş, Evren Erzen, Pinar Duru, Nalan Bostan, Berrak Mizrak Şahin, İlkay Çulha, and Burcu Babadağ

Background and aims

Phubbing can be described as an individual looking at his or her mobile phone during a conversation with other individuals, dealing with the mobile phone and escaping from interpersonal communication. In this research, determinants of phubbing behavior were investigated; in addition, the effects of gender, smart phone ownership and social media membership were tested as moderators.

Methods

To examine the cause–effect relations among the variables of the theoretical model, the research employs a correlational design. Participants were 409 university students who were selected via random sampling. Phubbing was obtained via the scales featuring mobile phone addiction, SMS addiction, internet addiction, social media addiction and game addiction. The obtained data were analyzed using a correlation analysis, multiple linear regression analysis and structural equation model.

Results

The results showed that the most important determinants of phubbing behavior are mobile phone, SMS, social media and internet addictions.

Discussion

Although the findings show that the highest correlation value explaining phubbing is a mobile phone addiction, the other correlation values reflect a dependency on the phone.

Conclusions

There is an increasing tendency towards mobile phone use, and this tendency prepares the basis of phubbing.

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Fatih Canan, Servet Karaca, Melike Düzgün, Ayşe Merve Erdem, Esranur Karaçaylı, Nur Begüm Topan, Sang-Kyu Lee, Zu Wei Zhai, Murat Kuloğlu, and Marc N. Potenza

Background and aims

The ratio of the second and fourth fingers (2D:4D ratio) is a sexually dimorphic trait, with men tending to have lower values than women. This ratio has been related to prenatal testosterone concentrations and addictive behaviors including problematic video-gaming. We aimed to investigate the possible association between 2D:4D ratios and Internet addiction and whether such a relationship would be independent of impulsivity.

Methods

A total of 652 university students (369 women, 283 men), aged 17–27 years, were enrolled in the study. Problematic and pathological Internet use (PPIU) was assessed using the Internet Addiction Test (IAT). The participants also completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (version 11; BIS-11) and had their 2D:4D ratios measured.

Results

2D:4D ratios were not significantly different in women with PPIU and in those with adaptive Internet use (AIU). Men with PPIU exhibited lower 2D:4D ratios on both hands when compared with those with AIU. Correlation analysis revealed that 2D:4D ratios on both hands were negatively correlated with IAT scores among men, but not among women. The multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age, duration of weekly Internet use, impulsiveness, and 2D:4D ratios on the right hand were independently associated with IAT scores among men, and impulsivity did not mediate the relationship between 2D:4D ratios and PPIU.

Conclusions

For men, 2D:4D ratios on the right hand were inversely correlated with Internet addiction severity even after controlling for individual differences in impulsivity. These findings suggest that high prenatal testosterone levels may contribute to the occurrence of PPIU among men.

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Josephine Savard, Tatja Hirvikoski, Katarina Görts Öberg, Cecilia Dhejne, Christoffer Rahm, and Jussi Jokinen

Abstract

Background and aims

Impulsivity is regarded as a risk factor for sexual crime reoffending, and a suggested core feature in Compulsive Sexual Behavior Disorder. The aim of this study was to explore clinical (e.g. neurodevelopmental disorders), behavioral and neurocognitive dimensions of impulsivity in disorders of problematic sexuality, and the possible correlation between sexual compulsivity and impulsivity.

Methods

Men with Compulsive Sexual Behavior Disorder (n = 20), and Pedophilic Disorder (n = 55), enrolled in two separate drug trials in a specialized Swedish sexual medicine outpatient clinic, as well as healthy male controls (n = 57) were assessed with the Hypersexual Behavior Inventory (HBI) for sexual compulsivity, and with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and Connors’ Continuous Performance Test-II (CPT-II) for impulsivity. Psychiatric comorbidity information was extracted from interviews and patient case files.

Results

Approximately a quarter of the clinical groups had Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or Autism Spectrum Disorder. Both clinical groups reported more compulsive sexuality (r = 0.73−0.75) and attentional impulsivity (r = 0.36−0.38) than controls (P < 0.05). Based on results on univariate correlation analysis, BIS attentional score, ADHD, and Commissions T-score from CPT-II were entered in a multiple linear regression model, which accounted for 15% of the variance in HBI score (P < 0.0001). BIS attentional score was the only independent positive predictor of HBI (P = 0.001).

Discussion

Self-rated attentional impulsivity is an important associated factor of compulsive sexuality, even after controlling for ADHD. Psychiatric comorbidity and compulsive sexuality are common in Pedophilic Disorder.

Conclusion

Neurodevelopmental disorders and attentional impulsivity – including suitable interventions – should be further investigated in both disorders.

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Josephine Savard, Tatja Hirvikoski, Katarina Görts Öberg, Cecilia Dhejne, Christoffer Rahm, and Jussi Jokinen

Abstract

Background and aims

Impulsivity is regarded as a risk factor for sexual crime reoffending, and a suggested core feature in Compulsive Sexual Behavior Disorder. The aim of this study was to explore clinical (e.g. neurodevelopmental disorders), behavioral and neurocognitive dimensions of impulsivity in disorders of problematic sexuality, and the possible correlation between sexual compulsivity and impulsivity.

Methods

Men with Compulsive Sexual Behavior Disorder (n = 20), and Pedophilic Disorder (n = 55), enrolled in two separate drug trials in a specialized Swedish sexual medicine outpatient clinic, as well as healthy male controls (n = 57) were assessed with the Hypersexual Behavior Inventory (HBI) for sexual compulsivity, and with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and Connors’ Continuous Performance Test-II (CPT-II) for impulsivity. Psychiatric comorbidity information was extracted from interviews and patient case files.

Results

Approximately a quarter of the clinical groups had Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or Autism Spectrum Disorder. Both clinical groups reported more compulsive sexuality (r = 0.73−0.75) and attentional impulsivity (r = 0.36−0.38) than controls (P < 0.05). Based on results on univariate correlation analysis, BIS attentional score, ADHD, and Commissions T-score from CPT-II were entered in a multiple linear regression model, which accounted for 15% of the variance in HBI score (P < 0.0001). BIS attentional score was the only independent positive predictor of HBI (P = 0.001).

Discussion

Self-rated attentional impulsivity is an important associated factor of compulsive sexuality, even after controlling for ADHD. Psychiatric comorbidity and compulsive sexuality are common in Pedophilic Disorder.

Conclusion

Neurodevelopmental disorders and attentional impulsivity – including suitable interventions – should be further investigated in both disorders.

Open access