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people were reticent to call the Devil or other evil creatures, such as the wolf or snake, by their real name, particularly during Lent ( Brīvzemnieks 1881 :159). Some folk beliefs also state that if the devil is mentioned, he appears: “The word ‘devil

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Abstract

Albasty is one of the most commonly known malevolent beings among Turkic peoples from the Altay Mountains via the Caucasus and up as far as the Volga River. This article focuses on Turkic data from the Volga region (Chuvash, Tartar, Bashkir) and the Eurasian Steppe (Kazak, Kyrgyz, Nogay, Uzbek). Various areas can be ascertained on the basis of verbal charms and folk-belief narratives. On the Eurasian Steppe, for example, Albasty was first and foremost a puerperal demon. In this territory, specialists (kuuču) were called in to keep away or oust the demon at birth. Many recorded legends and memorates concern healing methods and the process of becoming a healer. In contrast, epic texts or narratives are rarer,in the Volga region, yet there are certain verbal incantations against the Albasty, which here is rather a push or disease demon.

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inspired by folk beliefs, citing the Grimms as a benchmark ( Tóth 1837 :725). In an article published in 1840 under the title Népmondák (Folk Legends), Ferenc Pulszky described folk belief, folk customs, and folk poetry as vestiges of a

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.7592/Incantatio2011_1_Kapalo Keszeg , Vilmos 2013 Hiedelmek, narratívumok, stratégiák [ Folk Beliefs, Narratives and Interpretative Strategies ]. Kolozsvár: Kriza János Néprajzi Társaság–BBTE Magyar Néprajz és Antropológia Tanszék . (Néprajzi egyetemi

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.37.hesz Honko , Lauri 1964 Memorates and the Study of Folk Beliefs . Journal of the Folklore Institute 1 ( 1–2 ): 5 – 19 . 10.2307/3814027 Ilić , Мarija 2007 A Shift in Ethics. The Serb/Albanian Conflict in the Vernacular Discourse of a

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Christianity and Folk Belief at Colossae (WUNT II. 77). Tübingen (1995). 50 IJO II pp. 342–448, nos. 167–214 (Aizanoi, Akmoneia, Amorion, Apameia, Appia, Diokleia, Dokimeion, Dorylaion, Eumeneia, Hierapolis, Kotiaeion, Laodikeia/Lykos, Synnada). 51 A. Schalit

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