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Have we reached the point where more spending on health care and other forms of social protection is not producing better health as measured by reductions in population mortality? Drawing on two decades of research and mortality statistics (1995–2015) for 17 OECD countries, our analysis confirms and builds on the observed relationship between the returns and investments in health and social welfare spending. First, the results suggest that there is a differential effect of socioeconomic, lifestyle and demography variables on total and cause-specific mortality rates. Second, the basic premise of an association between health care expenditure and mortality rates is reinforced in models that take into account public-only health expenditure and its impact on older age groups. Third, a strong protective effect of government-sponsored welfare expenditure on infant mortality was observed. This effect is weaker on other causes of death and suggests that older individuals, in this sample of developed countries, may have reached a stage of the epidemiological transition in which health improvement is indifferent to government assistance and depends largely on behavioural change.

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this change is that the Islamic population of the world increases even in proportion ( Figure 1 ). According to Stürning (2011) , a quarter of the world's population will have been Muslim by 2020 and even more by 2030. Figure 1. The share of Islamic

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is not able to meet these requirements, for this reason there should be other goals of what the government would like to achieve than the increase of economic welfare of the population. Beyond that contradiction the most embarrassing fact is that

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questionnaire survey was designed with the involvement of university students. In terms of cognitive differences between individuals, university students offer a more homogenous population than, for instance, representative sampling of the population. Although

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Budapest in Hungary with a population of 145,000), which already requested bailout in the middle of 2017. However, this time the central government picked up the gauntlet and set strict conditions for another bailout. This deterrent example may represent a

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a rather small class of oligarchs. While public property was distributed broadly among the population, most recipients without experiences of entrepreneurship and capital, sold their vouchers to a few people, well connected to the Kremlin who in

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–2016; EU15 = 100) Next, drawing on the PWT 9.0 17 , we show the relationship between the price level of GDP and per capita real GDP for a large sample of countries with population size above 1 million, and contrast the results with those for the EU25 ( Fig

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Acta Oeconomica
Authors: Zsolt Tibor Kosztyán, Vivien Valéria Csányi, and András Telcs

only the first, but the second, third etc. applications. We put emphasis on the students' sensitivity to the distance and econo-geographic factors, which, of course, depend on the population structure, the size and the cultural history of a given

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the decimal logarithm of the dependent, as well as control variables. We rely on the following regional level controls. First, urbanisation economies are controlled for by population density ( POPDENS ), as it is commonly used in economic geography. We

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were largely fuelled by a huge and rapidly growing population ( Nofri 2015 ). For example, the traditional command system on admission and placement was abandoned so as to give schools some flexibility in enrolment. Traditionally free HE was transformed

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