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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: ZSUZSANNA Csukás, KLÁRA Törö, I. Jankovics, F. Rozgonyi, P. Sótonyi, Zs. Antal, L. Manczinger, L. Kredics, and Lajos Ferenczy
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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: ZS. Antal, L. Manczinger, L. Kredics, Lajos Ferenczy, Zs. Benkő, M. Miskei, Cs. Fenyvesvölgyi, V. Benesoczki, and M. Sipiczki
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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Zsuzsanna Antal, L. Kredics, J. Pakarinen, Ilona Dóczi, Maria Andersson, Mirja Salkinoja-Salonen, L. Manczinger, A. Szekeres, L. Hatvani, C. Vágvölgyi, and Elisabeth Nagy

Potential virulence factors of 9 saprophytic and 12 clinical Trichoderma longibrachiatum strains were examined in the present study, in order to compare their capacity to cause infection in humans. All of the strains were able to grow at temperatures up to 40 °C and at pH values ranging from 2.0 to 9.0. Carbon and nitrogen source utilization experiments revealed that all of the strains were able to utilize a series of basic amino acids both as sole carbon and nitrogen sources. The MIC values of the tested antifungal drugs were found to be 0.016-8 µg/ml for amphotericin B, 64-256 µg/ml for fluconazole, 0.5-32 µg/ml for itraconazole and 0.008-1 µg/ml for ketoconazole in the case of the examinedis olates. Metabolites of the strains inhibited the growth of different bacteria, furthermore, compounds produced by three clinical isolates reduced the motility of boar spermatozoa, indicating their toxicity to mammalian cells as well. On the whole, there were no significant differences in the examined features between strains derived from clinical or soil samples. The question, however, whether all environmental Trichoderma longibrachiatum strains have the capacity to cause infections or not, remains still unanswered.

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