Search Results

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 65 items for

  • Author or Editor: S. Landsberger x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract  

Neutron activation analysis (INAA) has been applied to multielemental determination of eleven medicinal plants used to cure the urinary tract diseases observed in Algeria. These plants include Androgena Citratus, Ceratonia Siliquata, Punica Granatum, Glyryrrhiza Glabra, Lausaunia Alba, Fragaria Vesca, Arbutus Unedol, Hordeum Vulgaris, Papieteria Officinalis, Zea Mays L, and Davallia Seae. Concentrations of twenty elements Ba, Br, Ca, Cl, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, I, Mn, Na, Mg, Rb, Sb, Se, Sc, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn have been determined by short, and long irradiation times with a thermal and epithermal flux of 1.4·1012 n·cm−2·s−1 and 1.4·1011 n·cm−2·s−1, respectively. These analyses were performed in conjunction with Compton suppression. In almost herbs studied the Co, Cr, Cu, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se and V are found to be present at trace levels, Br, Mn, and Zn at the minor level, and Ca, Cl, Fe, Mg and Na are generally at the major level. The accuracy of the measurements has been evaluated by analyzing NIST-botanical references materials.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Several methods for the electrodeposition of actinides for alpha-spectrometry analysis have been developed over the past few decades, but none have been specifically designed to facilitate rapid analysis in a field situation. This paper describes the development of an electrodeposition procedure that is specifically adapted for use in a mobile lab. Using these techniques one would be able to obtain preliminary results in the event of a radiological incident. Quantitative yields with associated uncertainties have been determined for the procedure. It has also been shown that short deposition times can provide quantitative results.

Restricted access

Abstract  

The Compton suppression system (CSS) has been thoroughly characterized at the University of Texas’ Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL). Effects of dead-time, sample displacement from primary detector, and primary energy detector position relative to the active shield detector have been measured and analyzed. Also, the applicability of Poisson counting statistics to Compton suppression spectroscopy has been evaluated.

Restricted access

Abstract  

In the field of radiation effects in materials, a detailed and precise description of the radiation environment used to damage samples is often required to make sense of subsequent materials analysis. The types of reactions and extent of damage that occur during irradiation strongly depend on the flux spectrum of the particular facility. Different neutron activation techniques for characterizing neutron flux spectra were performed on the University of Texas at Austin TRIGA research reactor’s in-core facilities. The results were compared in terms of spectral detail and precision. Activation of Au foils with multiple correction factors, and multiple foil activation employing different deconvolution techniques comprise the methods tested.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) significantly reduces volume and mass by as much as 80%, prolonging the life span of landfills. The concentration of heavy metals in the ash and their ability to leach into ground water is a serious concern when siting and designing MSWI ash landfills. Improved technology captures most heavy metals in the ash. The distribution of elements among the different ash particle sizes was determined by NAA. The bottom ash residue was separated into fractions ranging from 9.5 mm to 0.3 mm. The fly ash was separated into fractions from 250 m to 20 m. Landfills usually bury a mixture of both. The combined ash was separated into fractions over the entire range from >9.5 mm to <20 m. Thermal and epithermal neutron irradiations of size fractionated MSW bottom, fly and combined ash were performed to determine the distribution of various metals within the ash. Compared to normal soil, the ashes contained elevated amounts of numerous elements. Concentrations of the more enriched elements (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Sb, Se, Sr and Zn) in fly ash were of particular interest as source markers.

Restricted access

Abstract  

A suite of shallow and deep subsurface waters from southwestern Illinois has been analyzed for chlorine (CT), bromine (Br), and sodium (Na+) using three different methods. Cl and Br were analyzed by ion chromatography (IC) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). Na was analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AESS) and NAA. In addition, five water standards were prepared with compositions over the range of Cl, Br, and Na concentrations in the natural waters were analyzed using the same methods. Analytical results for the prepared standards by the different methods were in good agreement. However, analytical results on natural waters yielded generally poor agreement between the methods. Our results suggest that solute concentrations and ratios between major solutes in subsurface waters determined by IC and ICP-AES may involve substantial laboratory error.

Restricted access

Summary  

We have employed Compton supression neutron activation analysis in conjunction with thermal and epithermal neutrons to detemine trace elements in airborne particulate matter in Lisbon, Portugal. As a result of the proximity of ocean marine, elements such as sodium and chlorine can signficantly decrease the analytical sensitivities of many elements of interest due ot the high backgrounds arising from 38Cl and 24Na. Compton suppression has resulted in the increase of the analytical sensitivities using thermal neutrons of Al, Ba, Ce, Cr, Cu, Ni, Rb, Se, Th, Ti, V, and Zn. The use of Compton suppression and epithermal neutrons significantly reduced the detection limits for As, I, K, Si, and W, while the utilization of solely epithermal neutrons improved the analyses of In.

Restricted access

Summary  

In the last decade Compton suppressed neutron activation analysis has had increasing popularity as a powerful method to significantly lower backgrounds and reduce overlapping peaks caused by spectral or nuclear interferences. We give a detailed descriptive evaluation of the unique features of this technique and its usefulness in many areas of research employing non-destructive neutron activation analysis.

Restricted access
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: S. Landsberger, A. Simsons, J. Kramer, J. Drake, S. Vermette, B. Shuter, and P. Ihssen

Abstract  

Instrumental neutron activation analysis has been successfully employed in three distrinct acid precipitation studies. These include the determination of ten (Al, Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, I, Mg, Mn, Na and V) elements in urban rainfall, elevated aluminum concentrations in acidified lakes and major ions (Ca, Cl, K, Mg and Na) in small-mouth bass kept in controlled pH environments. Quality control was assured by analyzing two certified standard reference materials prepared by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS 1643a) and National Research Council of Canada (hepatopancreas TORT-1 marine biological tissue).

Restricted access

Abstract  

Neutron activation analysis (NAA) remains an excellent technique to introduce undergraduate students to nuclear science and engineering coming from different academic areas. The NAA methods encompass an appreciation of basic reactor engineering concepts, radiation safety, nuclear instrumentation and data analysis. At the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Lab at the University of Texas at Austin we have continued to provide opportunities through outreach programs to Huston-Tillotson University in Austin and Florida Memorial University in Miami Gardens, both Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas. Furthermore, in the past four years we have established a strong educational collaboration with the École Nationale Supérieure d’Ingénieurs de Caen (ENSICAEN), France. Undergraduate students at ENSICAEN are required to have an internship outside of France. While many of the students stay in neighboring European countries others have chosen the United States. The cornerstone of these programs is to secure a relationship with each institution through clear educational and research objectives and goals.

Restricted access