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  • Author or Editor: F. Wu x
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Abstract  

Complexes of cell–THPC–urea–ADP with transition metal ion Co2+ and lanthanide metal ions such as La3+, Ce4+, Nd3+ and Sm3+ have been prepared. The thermal behavior and smoke suspension of the samples are determined by TG, DTA, DTG and cone calorimetry. The activation energies for the second stage of thermal degradation have been obtained by following Broido equation. Experimental data show that for the complexes of cell–THPC–urea–ADP with the metal ions, the activation energies and thermal decomposition temperatures are higher than those of cell–THPC–urea–ADP, which shows these metal ions can increase the thermal stability of cell–THPC–urea–ADP. Moreover, these lanthanide metal ions can more increase thermal stability of samples than do the transition metal ion Co2+. The cone calorimetry data indicate that the lanthanide metal ions, similar to transition metal Co2+, greatly decrease the smoke, CO and CO2 generation of cell–THPC–urea–ADP, which can be used as smoke suppressants.

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Abstract  

An apparatus to study the battery system has been set up. The thermal effects of charge and discharge of Ni-MH batteries have been studied. The calorimetric measurements indicate that the net heat dissipation during charging is larger than that during discharging. It is observed that the ratio of heat dissipation to charging energy varies with charging capacity, and almost 90 percent of charging energy is lost as heat dissipation near the end of the charging process at 97.7 mA. A jump of thermal curve near the end of discharge due to a secondary electrode reaction has been observed.

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Abstract  

In this work some calorimetric measurements were also carried out on the electrorefining silver by using different current densities with a Calvet type microcalorimeter at room temperature. The ratio (R) of the measured heat (

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m) to the input electric energy (
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in) and the excess heat (
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ex), i.e., difference between
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m and
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in during the electrorefining process, were discussed in terms of general thermodynamics. It was found that the R and
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ex for silver were related with the current density or cell voltage employed in the experiment. The results obtained here also indicate that the heat generation under different conditions, such as different currents or voltages may be caused partially by the irreversibility of the process or by some unknown processes.

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Abstract  

This work discusses thermal behavior of Ni/MH battery with experimental methods. The present work not only provides a new way to get more exactly parameters and thermal model, but also concentrates on thermal behavior in discharging period. With heat generation rate gained by experiments with microcalorimeter, heat transport equations are set up and solved. The solutions are compared with experiment results and used to understand the reactions inside the battery. Experiments with microcalorimeter provide more reliable data to create precise thermal model.

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Abstract  

The thermal mechanical properties and degradation behaviors were studied on fibers prepared from two high-performance, heterocyclic polymers, poly(p-phenylenebenzobisthiazole) (PBZT) and poly(p-phenylenebenzobisoxazole) (PBZO). Our research demonstrated that these two fibers exhibited excellent mechanical properties and outstanding thermal and thermo-oxidative stability. Their long-term mechanical tensile performance at high temperatures was found to be critically associated with the stability of the C—O or C—S linkage at the heterocyclic rings on these polymers' backbones. PBZO fibers with the C—O linkages displayed substantially higher thermal stability compared to PBZT containing C—S linkages. High resolution pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry provided the information of the pyrolyzates' compositions and distributions as well as their relationships with the structures of PBZT and PBZO. Based on the analysis of the compositions and distributions of all pyrolyzates at different temperatures, it was found that the thermal degradation mechanisms for both of these heterocyclic polymers were identical. Kevlar®-49 fibers were also studied under the same experimental conditions in order to make a comparison of thermo-oxidative stability and long-term mechanical performance at high temperatures with PBZO and PBZT fibers. The data of two high-performance aromatic polyimide fibers were also included as references.

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Precursors of unsupported NiMo and FeMo sulfide hydrodesulfurization catalysts with concentration ratiosr=Ni(Fe)/(Ni(Fe) + Mo) ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 were prepared by three methods: homogeneous sulfide precipitation (HSP), inverse HSP and coprecipitation. Differential thermal analysis was used to study the decomposition under argon, and the reduction/sulfidation under 15% H2S—H2 of the precursors and the subsequent oxidation under air of the samples obtained after these reactions. The reactivity of the solids varies as a function of the preparation method, the nature of the promoter and the concentration ratio. The degree of sulfidation of the precursor and the presence of either NH4NO3 or NH2Cl formed from group VIII metal salts and (NH4)2S may affect the thermal behaviour of samples during DTA.

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Abstract  

The uranium(VI) accumulation was studied in detail by using the biomass of mangrove endophytic fungus Fusarium sp.#ZZF51 from the South China Sea. The uranium(VI) biosorption process onto the tested fungus powders was optimized at pH 4.0, adsorption time 60 min, and uranium(VI) initial concentration 50 mg L−1 with 61.89% of removal efficiency. According to Fourier transform infrared spectra for the tested fungus before and after loaded with uranium(VI), the results showed that both of hydroxyl and carboxyl groups acted as the important roles in the adsorption process. In addition, the experimental data were analyzed by using parameter and kinetic models, and it was obtained that the Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided better correlation with the experimental data for adsorption of uranium(VI).

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Abstract  

With the low permeability and high swelling property, Gaomiaozi (GMZ) bentonite is regarded as the favorable candidate backfilling material for a potential repository. The diffusion behaviors of HTO in GMZ bentonite were studied to obtain effective diffusion coefficient (D e) and accessible porosity (ε) by through- and out-diffusion experiments. A computer code named Fitting for diffusion coefficient (FDP) was used for the experimental data processing and theoretical modeling. The D e and ε values were (5.2–11.2) × 10−11 m2/s and 0.35–0.50 at dry density from 1,800 to 2,000 kg/m3, respectively. The D e values at 1,800 kg/m3 was a little higher than that of at 2,000 kg/m3, whereas the D e value at 1,600 kg/m3 was significantly higher (approximately twice) than that of at 1,800 and 2,000 kg/m3. It may be explained that the diffusion of HTO mainly occurred in the interlayer space for the highly compacted clay (dry density exceeding 1,300 kg/m3). 1,800 and 2,000 kg/m3 probably had similar interlayer space, whereas 1,600 kg/m3 had more. Both D e and ε values decreased with increasing dry density. For compacted bentonite, the relationship of D e and ε could be described by Archie’s law with exponent n = 4.5 ± 1.0.

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