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  • Author or Editor: M. J. Evans x
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Abstract  

In this paper we present our recent positron annihilation study of the liquid»solid phase boundary for CO2 confined in nanometer pores of VYCOR glass. We find that CO2 remains liquid in the pores far below the bulk freezing temperature and there is pronounced hysteresis between freezing and melting compared to that seen at the gas-liquid boundary in the pores. On freezing we see evidence of open space created in the pores. This leads to complex melting behaviour possibly involving the formation of gas-liquid interfaces. We see that frezing in the pores is totally irreversible, so that any solid which forms (no matter how small) remains stable up to the higher melting temperature. In contrast melting is more reversible (possibly indicating nucleation centres which permit immediate re-freezing). Finally, the pre-frozen state in the pores is different to the post-melted state.

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Abstract  

Summertime urban PM2.5 was collected on cellulose filters in downtown Toronto, using a customized air sampler (635 l/min). Mass concentrations for up to 19 trace elements/ions were measured by ICP-AES, INAA and IC. Source apportionment was performed on these results including additional carbon and total mass concentrations using positive matrix factorization (PMF). PMF factors exhibited trends that indicated soil (18%), stationary (19%), secondary (48%), and vehicle (15%) sources. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis identified probable sources of the stationary and secondary PM2.5 as originating from the south and southwest of Toronto.

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