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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: J. Varga, R. Kiss, T. Mátrai, T. Mátrai, and J. Téren

Ochratoxin A is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species. This mycotoxin is a common contaminant of various food products including cereal products, spices, dried fruits, coffee, beer and wine. Besides cereal products, beer and wine contribute significantly to ochratoxin exposure of humans. We examined the ochratoxin content of Hungarian wines and beers using an immunochemical technique. The detection limit of this technique is 0.01mg l-1. Altogether 65 wine and 25 beer samples were analysed. The presence of ochratoxin A was confirmed by HPLC in positive samples. Ochratoxin A was detected in 97.7% of wines, with ochratoxin concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.533mg l-1. The mean ochratoxin A concentration in wines was 0.110mg l-1. Only one of the Hungarian wines examined contained more than 0.5mg l-1ochratoxin A, the previously suggested EU limit for wine. Our data indicate that red wines are more frequently contaminated, and have higher mean ochratoxin contamination (0.117mg ml-1) than white wines (0.0967mg ml-1), in accordance with previous observations. A North-South gradient in wine ochratoxin concentrations is not evident from our data. For beers, all but one of the samples was found to be contaminated with small amounts of ochratoxin A with a mean concentration of 0.127mg l-1(range: 0.030-0.250mg l-1). Only one of the beers contained ochratoxin A above 0.2mg l-1, the anticipated European Community maximum allowable limit in beer. We could not detect correlation between the type and origin of beer and ochratoxin contamination.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: R.V Salamon, É. Vargáné-Visi, Cs.D. András, Zs. Csapóné Kiss, and J. Csapó

The addition of synthetic CLA is a possible way in order to compose foods enriched with conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs). The most environmental friendly methods for CLA synthesis are based on microbial biosynthesis. With homogeneous catalysis using organometallic catalysts (Ru and Rh complexes) high (approximately 80%) yields were obtained with high selectivity related to bioactive isomers. The heterogeneous catalysis has the advantage that at the end of the reaction there is no need for a supplementary separation operation or recycling of the catalyst. In heterogeneous process, the maximum yield may even be higher than 90% and the selectivity remains quite high as the reaction conditions are optimized. The substrates for obtaining CLAs are, in general, linoleic acid or alkyl linoleates and the catalysis is acidic. The yield and the selectivity depend on the strength and the type of acidic sites, as well as on the size distribution of the particles. Beside the existing catalytic methods, a photocatalytic process with UV and visible light irradiation with iodine promoter can be applied.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: R. Kiss, G. Szita, M. Herpay, Gy. Csikó, J. Pászti, T. Mag, P. Kovács, G. Kovács, J. Szita, P. Tóth, I. Szatmári, and S. Bernáth

The authors investigated the possibility of the presence of VTEC strains in improperly pasteurized milk samples. A total of 64 Escherichia coli strains were isolated from 135 pasteurized milk samples originating from the same producer. The examined isolates contained 29 haemolysin-, 9 colicin- and 5 aerobactin-producing strains, but the investigations concerning heat-resistant and heat-sensitive toxins gave negative results.Six O128-type E. coli strains exerted a cytotoxic effect on the VERO cell line; 5 of them contained H12 antigen, while one could not be typed. Four of the 6 verocytotoxin-producing strains belonged in phage group 20, one in phage group (2)3(7), and one in phage group 4; four strains were of B3, one of A1, and one of A1(A2) phage type.Because of a technical failure the milk was pasteurized at 69 °C for 15 s, which is 2 °C less than required. The results underline the importance of the appropriate pasteurization temperature, as otherwise the milk may contain verocytotoxin-producing E. coli, which is a potentially great hazard for public health.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: K. Szentmihályi, G. A. Csiktusnádi-Kiss, Á. Keszler, L. Kótai, M. Candeaias, M. R. Bronze, L. V. Boas, E. Forgács, and I. Spaugner

ICP-OES (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry) was used to determine the element content of red wines. Development of the method involves various procedures of sample handling as well as repeatability and reproducibility measurements. Measurements were made for the following 16 elements: Al, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Sr and Zn. The relative standard deviation of repeatability ranged from 0.41% (potassium) to 27% (cadmium) and that of reproducibility varied between 0.73% (boron) to 52% (cobalt). Recovery of the elements was determined by standard addition with results ranging from 90.6% (phosphorus) to 116.2% (boron). After that, 15 red wine samples were measured. Significant differences were found in the Al, B, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Sr and Zn (P<0.001) concentration of wine samples. Correlation studies revealed parallel changes in phosphorus-potassium, phosphorus-magnesium and zinc-manganese concentrations (r=0.857, 0.875, 0.838). According to principal component analysis, measurements of zinc-, sodium-, boron-, copper- and strontium content gave almost the same results as obtained with 16 different elements. According to a two dimensional non-linear map of absolute values of principal component analysis, wines from Szekszárd and Eger could be differentiated, whereas the analysis of wines from Villány, the Mátra Mountains and Lake Balaton showed overlapping results.

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