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Abstract

Rotational atherectomy (RA) in peripheral circulation is an advanced revascularization procedure, often used in cases where traditional percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) is inadequate and bypass grafting is either unavailable or undesired. We report on a case, where RA was successfully performed after failed traditional PTA. The case highlights the importance of RA in peripheral cases where severe calcification occurs and the lesion is not suitable for PTA (cannot be passed with balloon or is undilatable).

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Because of similar pathophysiologic changes, oleic acid (OA)-induced pulmonary edema has been well established as an experimental model of certain types of ARDS. Data in the literature indicate changes mostly in global pulmonary mechanical parameters (lung resistance and compliance) during permeability-type edema. Therefore, we designed this study (1) to separate the OA-induced mechanical responses into airway and parenchymal components, and (2) to examine the relationship between the mechanical parameters and the degree of edema. Anaesthetized, paralyzed, mechanically ventilated rats were given iv. OA in doses of 0 (C n=9), 0.05 (OA0.05 n=8), 0.1 (OA0.1 n=10) and 0.3 (OA0.3 n=5) ml/kg. Respiratory system impedance was measured with a wave-tube low-frequency forced oscillation technique, and a model fitting was used to estimate airway (Raw) and lung tissue parameters (G, parenchymal damping; H, elastance). Pulmonary edema was quantified by gravimetric analysis (WW/DW, wet-to-dry weight ratio). In the OAL0.05 group, transient, but significant increase in Raw, only slight increase in H, and no response in G was observed. Different responses were obtained in OA0.1: significant Raw, G, and H values in survivors; rapid and significantly higher responses in all three parameters in non-survivors. Extremely large parameter values were measured in OA0.3. We found that OA caused dose-related increases in WW, DW and WW/DW. Highly significant correlations were found between the degree of edema and G or H, but not Raw. This study demonstrates that low dose of OA had only transient lung mechanical effects; however, it resulted in mild edema. The higher dose elicited significant airway and tissue changes (smaller responses in survivors than in non-survivors), and severe edema. The strong correlation between lung tissue parameters and the degree of edema suggests that the OA-induced acute lung injury is manifested primarily in the alterations in parenchymal mechanics.

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The population in the Western world is aging. In 1996 those aged 60 years and over formed 21% of the EU population, by 2022 this proportion will have risen to 27%. Based on current trends a third of the EU population could be 60 years of age and over by the age 2050.Epidemiological studies suggest that even in the absence of other risk factors (e.g. diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia), advanced age itself significantly increases cardiovascular morbidity by promoting the development of atherosclerosis and by impairing normal cellular functions. One of the most prominent organs affected by aging is the kidney. There is evidence that age-associated phenotypic changes may be an important cause of renal failure. We propose that vascular oxidative stress and inflammation are generalized phenomena during senescence, which importantly contribute to the morphological and functional changes in the aging kidney. The present review focuses on some of the mechanisms by which advanced age may promote vascular oxidative and nitrosative stress and the possible downstream mechanisms by which reactive oxygen and nitrogen species may impair vascular and renal function in aging.

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Periodontal inflammation is associated with morphological changes in the blood vessels which may influence the regulation of gingival blood flow (GBF). Our aim was to adapt the heat provocation test to the human gingiva to assess vascular reactivity in periodontal inflammation. Method: GBF was recorded by Laser Doppler Flowmetry before and after heat provocation in healthy volunteers (n = 50). Heat was generated either by warm saline or a halogen lamp. The latter method was also utilized for a heat test in non-smoking and smoking patients with periodontal inflammation. The circulatory parameters were correlated to the inflammatory marker, i.e. gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) production measured by Periotron. Results: Local application of heat caused a rapid, significant and transient increase in GBF regardless of the method used. The increase in the speed and not in the concentration of moving blood cells was responsible for increased GBF. Higher GCF values were correlated with increased peak flow, flux pulse amplitude and faster restoration of GBF after the test in non-smokers, but not in smokers. Conclusions: The heat test could be a valuable tool to check the vascular reactivity of gingival vessels. Moderate periodontal inflammation may facilitate gingival vascular responsiveness which can be suppressed by smoking.

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Six pieces of grafts, 6.5 mm in diameter, 20 mm in length, were taken from each of 170 cadaver hindlimbs, using the cranial surface of the medial femoral trochlea for harvesting. The age of the horses varied between 4 months and 23 years. 30 limbs under the age of 12 years were selected for transplantation. Three of six grafts were transplanted into the medial femoral condyle using different combinations of tunnel depth and dilation. With ageing, a significant decline in transplantability was detected. In general, mosaicplasty cannot be recommended in horses above 11 years. Based on a previous clinical case (Bodo et al., 2000), a good surface alignment was indeed achieved with a combination of graft length drilling and dilation in most cases. However, the occasional entrapment of cartilage debris under the graft prevented perfect alignment in the present cadaver study in 27% of the grafts transplanted in this manner. Since the protrusion of grafts never exceeded 1.5 mm, we conclude that drilling 3–5 mm deeper than graft length with graft length deep dilation can avoid disadvantageous protrusion of the transplanted hyaline cartilage caps, achieving bone decompression at the same time.

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A simultaneous live/dead and acrosome staining, originally described for domestic mammals, was successfully applied on red deer (Cervus elaphus) and fallow deer (Dama dama) spermatozoa collected from the cauda epididymidis and vas deferens of shot stags. The staining is simple enough for routine application. Seven classes of spermatozoa were distinguished in the smears of frozen/thawed semen samples. Morphology, including cytoplasmic droplets, was evaluated as well. Percentage of live cells with intact acrosomes and with no other morphological aberrations might be a practical index of semen quality.

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Sperm samples were collected from the epididymides of 11 hunter-killed stags (Cervus elaphus hippelaphus) within 2 to 17 h post mortem in September 1991. Progressively motile spermatozoa were diluted and deep-frozen in tris-yolk extender by a procedure routinely used for bovine semen. The pre-freezing motility of spermatozoa from 6 stags was higher than 80%, while the sperm of 5 animals was found to be unsuitable for dilution. In the post-thawed sperm of six stags 40-50% of the spermatozoa showed progressive motility and the number of viable spermatozoa ranged from 8.6 to 26.7 × 106 per 0.25 ml straw. Two years later, three hinds were superovulated by the use of a progesterone-releasing intravaginal device (CIDR type G, Carter, Holt Harvey Plastic Products Group Ltd., Hamilton, New Zealand) for a period of 14 days and with follicle stimulating hormone (Folicotropin inj., Spofa, Prague). Each hind was inseminated artificially 60 h after the withdrawal of CIDR with thawed sperm injected into the uterus via the vagina. Seven days later the uteri were flushed out, as a result of which 3 early blastocysts + 1 ovum, 3 morulae + 4 ova, and 1 morula + 7 ova, respectively, were recovered from the three hinds. Deer embryos were frozen according to a glycerolbased freezing protocol. A further two years later two hinds were oestrussynchronised with CIDR type G and 300 IU PMSG (Folligon inj., Intervet, NL), and two of the thawed embryos were transplanted into two recipient hinds 7 days after heat. One of these gave birth to a normal stag fawn in June 1996. This was the first deer born in Hungary from embryo transfer. The results obtained indicate that sperm from top stags shot in the course of hunting can prove useful for the preservation of genetic material or in the development of the farmed deer system.

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Abstract

Purpose

Our aims were to evaluate the primary and clinical evisceration indications and to analyse orbital implant related complications.

Materials/methods

We included in our retrospective review all eviscerations between 2006 and 2016 at the Department of Ophthalmology of Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. Primary evisceration indications were classified into six groups: trauma, surgical diseases, infections or inflammations, systemic diseases, tumours and unclassifiable diseases. Clinical immediate evisceration indications were also classified into six groups: painful blind eye due to glaucoma, atrophia/phthisis bulbi, endophthalmitis, cosmetic reasons, acute trauma and expulsive bleeding.

Results

Evisceration was performed in 46 eyes of 46 patients (54.3% males, age 43.0 ± 18.6 years). The most common primary evisceration indications were trauma (37%), surgical diseases (34.8%), infection or inflammation (10.9%), systemic diseases (6.5%), tumours (8.7%) and unclassifiable diseases (2.2%). Painful blind eye due to glaucoma (34.8%) was the most common clinical indication for evisceration, followed by atrophia/phthisis bulbi (26.1%), endophthalmitis (17.4%), cosmetic reasons (13.0%), acute trauma (6.5%) and expulsive bleeding (2.2%). After evisceration, 91.3% of the patients received orbital implant and during 26.8±28.9 months follow-up implant related complications were found in 14.3% of the cases, including implant extrusion (4.8%), partial wound dehiscence (4.8%), implant exposure (2.4%) and orbital inflammation (2.4%).

Conclusion

Painful blind eye and atrophia/phthisis bulbi due to ocular trauma and surgical diseases represent the most common indications for ocular evisceration. If malignant intraocular tumours can be excluded, evisceration surgery combined with a silicon-based orbital implant is a safe and effective procedure.

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Abstract

Purpose

Our aims were to evaluate the primary and clinical evisceration indications and to analyse orbital implant related complications.

Materials/methods

We included in our retrospective review all eviscerations between 2006 and 2016 at the Department of Ophthalmology of Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. Primary evisceration indications were classified into six groups: trauma, surgical diseases, infections or inflammations, systemic diseases, tumours and unclassifiable diseases. Clinical immediate evisceration indications were also classified into six groups: painful blind eye due to glaucoma, atrophia/phthisis bulbi, endophthalmitis, cosmetic reasons, acute trauma and expulsive bleeding.

Results

Evisceration was performed in 46 eyes of 46 patients (54.3% males, age 43.0 ± 18.6 years). The most common primary evisceration indications were trauma (37%), surgical diseases (34.8%), infection or inflammation (10.9%), systemic diseases (6.5%), tumours (8.7%) and unclassifiable diseases (2.2%). Painful blind eye due to glaucoma (34.8%) was the most common clinical indication for evisceration, followed by atrophia/phthisis bulbi (26.1%), endophthalmitis (17.4%), cosmetic reasons (13.0%), acute trauma (6.5%) and expulsive bleeding (2.2%). After evisceration, 91.3% of the patients received orbital implant and during 26.8±28.9 months follow-up implant related complications were found in 14.3% of the cases, including implant extrusion (4.8%), partial wound dehiscence (4.8%), implant exposure (2.4%) and orbital inflammation (2.4%).

Conclusion

Painful blind eye and atrophia/phthisis bulbi due to ocular trauma and surgical diseases represent the most common indications for ocular evisceration. If malignant intraocular tumours can be excluded, evisceration surgery combined with a silicon-based orbital implant is a safe and effective procedure.

Open access

This study reports on the in vivo effects of four endomorphin-2 (EM-2) derivatives (EMD1-4) containing unnatural amino acids, i.e. 2-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid (Achc2), para-fluorophenylalanine (pFPhe4), β-methylphenylalanine (βMePhe4) and/or 2′,6′-dimethyltyrosine (Dmt1). After induction of osteoarthritis by monosodium iodoacetate into the ankle joint of male Wistar rats, a chronic intrathecal catheter was inserted for spinal drug delivery. The mechanical threshold was assessed by a dynamic aesthesiometer. Intrathecal injection of the original EM-2 and the ligands (0.3–10 μg) caused dose-dependent antiallodynic effects. The comparison of the different substances revealed that EMD3 and EMD4 showed more prolonged antinociception than EM-2, and the effects of the highest dose of EMD4 were comparable to morphine, while EMD3 caused paralysis at this dose. The potency of the different ligands did not differ from EM-2. The results show that the derivatives of EM-2 have similar in vivo potency to the original ligand, but their effects were more prolonged suggesting that these structural modifications may play a role in the development of novel endomorphin analogues with increased therapeutic potential.

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