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  • Author or Editor: S. Yariv x
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Abstract  

The formation of carnallite type double salts by grinding mixtures of hydrated magnesium halide and alkali halides with the same anions was investigated by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis. Carnallite (KMgCl3·6H2O), cesium-carnallite (CsMgCl3·6H2O), bromo-carnallite (KMgBr3·6H2O) and cesium-bromo-carnallite (CsMgBr3·6H2O) were formed by grinding mixtures of MgCl2·6H2O with KCl or CsCl and MgBr2·6H2O with KBr or CsBr, respectively. Hydrated solid solutions of magnesium in potassium or cesium halides were obtained from that portion of potassium and cesium halides which did not take part in the formation of the double salt.

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Abstract  

Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) kaolinite complexes of low-and high-defect kaolinites were studied by thermo-IR-spectroscopy analysis. Samples were gradually heated up to 170°C, three hours at each temperature. After cooling to room temperature, they were pressed into KBr disks and their spectra were recorded. From the spectra two types of complexes were identified. In the spectrum of type I complex two bands were attributed to asymmetric and symmetric H-O-H stretching vibrations of intercalated water, bridging between DMSO and the clay-O-planes. As a result of H-bonds between intercalated water molecules and the O-planes, Si-O vibrations of the clay framework were perturbed, in the low-defect kaolinite more than in the high-defect. Type II complex was obtained by the thermal escape of the intercalated water. Consequently, the H-O-H bands were absent from the spectrum of type II complex and the Si-O bands were not perturbed. Type I complex was present up to 120°C whereas type II between 130 and 150°C. The presence of intercalated DMSO was proved from the appearance of methyl bands. These bands decreased with temperature due to the thermal evolution of DMSO but disappeared only in spectra of samples heated at 160°C. Intercalated DMSO was H-bonded to the inner-surface hydroxyls and vibrations associated with this group were perturbed. Due to the thermal evolution of DMSO the intensities of the perturbed bands decreased with the temperature. They disappeared at 160°C together with the methyl bands.

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Abstract  

DMSO-kaolinite complexes of low- and high-defect Georgia kaolinite (KGa-1 and KGa-2, respectively) were investigated by thermo-XRD-analysis. X-ray patterns showed that DMSO was intercalated in both kaolinites with a d(001)-value of 1.11 nm (type I complex). The samples were gradually heated up to 170°C and diffracted by X-ray at room-temperature. With the rise in temperature, due to the thermal evolution of the guest molecules, the relative intensity of the 1.11 nm peak decreased and that of the 0.72 nm peak (neat kaolinite) increased indicating that the fraction of the non-intercalated tactoids increased. The 1.11 peak disappeared at 130–140°C. During the thermal treatment of both complexes two additional peaks appeared at 110 and 120°C, respectively, with d-values of 0.79–0.94 and 0.61–0.67 nm in DMSO-KGa-1 and 0.81–0.86 and 0.62–0.66 nm in DMSO-KGa-2, indicating the formation of a new phase (type II complex). The new complex was obtained by the dehydration of type I complex and was composed of intercalated DMSO molecules which did not escape. The new peaks disappeared at 150–160°C indicating the complete escape of DMSO.

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Summary Thermo-XRD-analysis is applied to identify whether or not the adsorbed organic species penetrates into the interlayer space of the smectites mineral. In this technique an oriented smectite sample is gradually heated to temperatures above the irreversible dehydration of the clay, and after each thermal treatment is diffracted by X-ray at ambient conditions. In the thermal treatment of organo-clays, under air atmosphere at temperatures above 250°C, the organic matter is in part oxidized and charcoal is formed from the organic carbon. In inert atmosphere e.g. under vacuum above 250°C the organic matter is pyrolyzed and besides small molecules, charcoal is formed. If the adsorbed organic compound is located in the interlayer space, the charcoal is formed in that space, preventing the collapse of the clay. A basal spacing of above 1.12 nm suggests that during the adsorption the organic compound penetrated into the interlayer space. Thermo-XRD-analyses of montmorillonite complexes with anilines, fatty acids, alizarinate, protonated Congo red and of complexes of other smectites with acridine orange are described. To obtain information about spacings of the different tactoids that comprise the clay mixture, curve-fitting calculations on the X-ray diffractograms were adapted.

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Abstract  

The swelling properties of Al-pillared clays, obtained from five different smectites, were studied using X-ray diffraction. These clays, the dioctahedral beidellite and montmorillonite and the trioctahedral saponite, hectorite and laponite differ in source of isomorphic substitution and represent a series of decreasing basicity along the siloxane plane. An Al oxyhydroxy cation was inserted between the layers to form the respective pillared clays and these clays were heated incrementally to 600°C. The XRD peaks at each stage of heating were recorded as well as the same samples subsequently wetted. Basal spacings of each clay at each stage of dehydration ↭d rehydration indicated that the swelling of tetrahedrally substituted saponite and beidellite was indeed restricted, compared with the other three clays. This was attributed to greater basicity of the oxygen plane of beidellite and saponite due to tetrahedral substitution of Si by Al, resulting in an increase in the strength of hydrogen bonds between either water or the interlayer polyhydroxy cation and the clay. The data from the XRD analyses helped in addition, to clarify the thermal transformations of the Keggin ion itself. According to the changes in thed-spacings of the pillared clays it was concluded that the Keggin ion lost its structural water at ∼200°C and dehydroxylated in a range beginning at 350°C. Between 500 to 600°C this polymer cation, which is thought to form the Al2O3 oxide, did not rehydrate.

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Summary  

Co- and Ni-montmorillonites adsorb in aqueous suspensions up to 13 mmol alizarinate per 100 g clay, onto the broken-bonds whereas Cu-clay adsorbs up to 25 mmol dye per 100 g clay into the interlayer space. Unloaded Co-, Ni- and Cu-clays and samples loaded with increasing amounts of alizarinate, were gradually heated in air to 360C and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. All diffractograms were curve-fitted. Fitted diffractograms of non-heated samples, showed two peak components labeled C and D, at1.22 and1.32 nm, characterizing tactoids with mono- and non-complete bilayers of water, respectively. After heating at 120C component D decreased or disappeared and two new components A and B appeared at0.99 and1.08 nm, representing collapsed tactoids and tactoids with interlamellar oxy-cations, respectively. At 250C, C and D decreased or disappeared but A and B appeared in all fitted diffractograms. Co- and Ni-clay after heating at 360C did not show C and D. Components A and B proved that these clays collapsed indicating that initially there was no alizarinate in the interlayers. At 360C, C and D persisted in the fitted-diffractograms of Cu-clay, representing tactoids with interlamellar charcoal formed from the partial oxidation of adsorbed dye initially located in the interlayers.

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Abstract  

The adsorption of the organic anionic dye Congo red (CR) by montmorillonite saturated with Na+, Cs+, Mg2+, Cu2+, Al3+ and Fe3+ was investigated by XRD of unwashed and washed samples after equilibration at 40% humidity and after heating at 360 and at 420°C. The clay was treated with different amounts of CR, most of which was adsorbed. Clay samples, untreated with CR, after heating showed collapsed interlayer space. Unwashed and washed samples, which contained CR, before heating were characterized by three peaks or shoulders, labeled A (at 0.96-0.99 nm, collapsed interlayers), B (at 1.24-1.36 nm) and C (at 2.10-2.50 nm). Peak B represents adsorbed monolayers of water and dye anions inside the interlayer spaces. Peak C represents interlayer spaces with different orientations of the adsorbed water and organic matter. Diffractograms of samples with small amounts of dye were similar to those without dye showing peak B whereas diffractograms of most samples with high amounts of dye showed an additional peak C. Heated unwashed and washed samples were also characterized by three peaks or shoulders, labeled A' (at 0.96 nm), B' (at 1.10-1.33 nm) and C' (at 1.61-2.10 nm), representing collapsed interlayers, and interlayers with charcoal composed of monolayers or multilayers of carbon. When the samples were heated from 360 to 420°C some of the charcoal monolayers underwent rearrangement to multilayers. In the case of Cu the charcoal decomposed and oxidized. The present results show that most of the adsorbed dye was located inside the interlayer space.

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Abstract  

The mechanochemical solid-state adsorption of the cationic dye crystal violet (CV) by montmorillonite was investigated by XRD and simultaneous DTA-TG. Solid CV was ground with the clay for 5 min and four different varieties of CV mechanochemically treated clay were investigated. X-ray and DTA data were compared with those of CV-montmorillonite obtained from an aqueous suspension. X-ray and DTA studies of a ground mixture and a ground mixture heated at 110°C suggest that the mechanochemical adsorption of organic cations takes place on the external surfaces of the clay. The study of a ground mixture washed with water, and washed with water and acetone reveal that water is essential for the penetration of CV into the interlayer space.

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