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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Borbála Hoffmann, Sándor Hoffmann, József Kruppa, and Dezső Szalay

381 385 Liszt B. — Hoffmann B. — Lángné Molnár M.: 2004. Triticum aestivum cv. Bánkúti 1201 x Agropyron elongatum részleges amphiploid molekuláris citogenetikai elemzése. X. Ifjusági

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I attempt to demonstrate that a substantial aspect of the performing style of the two most important pianists of the Hungarian Liszt school, Bartók and Dohnányi, together with other performers of the era to a certain extent, is the mainly unintentional slowing down at structurally relatively important or surprising moments in terms of musical meaning and, respectively, the speeding up of relatively unimportant or highly predictable moments. Relatively important or surprising moments include the appearance of a new theme, structural boundaries, atypical modulations, and the like; relatively unimportant or highly predictable moments include sequences, transitional passages, and, to a certain extent, cadential formulae. Computer-assisted analysis of microtiming patterns of representative recording samples as well as their comparison with preliminary results of a listening experiment suggests a tight connection of Bartók’s and Dohnányi’s rubato patterns with structural importance and predictability.

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Born to a Croatian father in Constantinople and educated in Vienna, August Adelburg (1830–1873) was a true cosmopolitan. His explicitly “national opera” about Miklós Zrínyi (c1508–1566), a Hungarian national hero of Croatian origins, was premiered in Hungarian translation on 23 June 1868 in the National Theater in Pest. The libretto (originally in German, and adapted by the composer from a drama by Theodor Körner) includes a preface that adumbrates a wholesale theory of cosmopolitanized national opera, as it were. Elaborating his views as expressed in his 1859 essay against Liszt’s On the Gypsies and their music in Hungary, Adelburg insists that the hegemony of the three traditional musical styles—German, French, and Italian—is obsolete, since “the tones have a single expressive language, which is divided into as many dialects as there are musical nations in the world.” At the same time, he also considers the overly use of less “worn-out” national styles misguided, since letting each character sing in the same manner is like “putting a Parisian lady’s hat, instead of an antique helmet, on Minerva’s head, and dressing the Roman emperors in black tailcoat, rather than sagum.” Therefore, a truly up-to-date national opera must in fact be “cosmopolitan” (Adelburg himself uses the term) in its sensitive portrayal of each individual character. Following a brief analysis of some of the most prominent “national” numbers of the work, I conclude by suggesting that Adelburg’s ideas about “cosmopolitanizing the national” render his Zrínyi a kind of mediator between two outstanding Hungarian operas of the period: Mihály Mosonyi’s “all-Hungarian” Szép Ilon (1861), and Ferenc Erkel’s “cosmopolitan” Brankovics György (1874).

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Abstract

Dohnányi's Second Piano Quintet in E-flat minor was written in 1914 and is less well-known than his first one dating from 1895. The composer has been called a traditionalist, so it is worth examining how tradition appears in this work. The outer movements of the three-movement-form are both elegiac and weighty. The beginning bears the key signature of E-flat major instead of minor, but the keys are changing rapidly as the piece progresses. This is reminiscent of Franz Schubert or of Antonín Dvořák, for instance in his Piano Quartet (op. 87) inspired by Brahms. The third movement's opening is a homage to Beethoven's late String Quartet in A Minor (op. 132). While the latter works on a sub-thematic level, Dohnányi presents an elaborated theme in fugal technique, which in 1914 was a more conservative approach than Beethoven's in 1825. For Dohnányi, the symmetric structures are not a way out of traditional tonality (unlike for Bartók, who also frequently used symmetries), but rather are a way of extending it. The formal concept is no less interesting. The recapitulation of the first movement's material within the third is evocative of the double-function form used by Franz Liszt. While Liszt conflated the traditional multi-movement form into a new one-movement form, Dohnányi – so to speak – concealed the characteristics of the new one-movement form inside a traditional three-movement form. Thus, one could ask if the accusations against Dohnányi for being a traditionalist are justified. Perhaps instead we should reconsider how traditionalism and modernity are situated in our own set of aesthetic values.

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New strategies for sustainable rural development 1993 Pollhamer E.-né (1981): A búza és a liszt minősége

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és a liszt minősége. Mezőgazdasági Kiadó, Budapest Pollhamer E.-n. A búza és a liszt minősége 1981

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significant cities in terms of artistic events (see Plate 1 ). 3 However, the idea of organizing public concerts as well as the personal encouragement of the Doppler brothers was probably Franz Liszt’s doing. During the above-mentioned summer tour, the

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Hooker, Lynn M., 2013. Redefining Hungarian Music from Liszt to Bartók . New York: Oxford University Press. Hooker L M Redefining Hungarian Music from

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Karácsonyi, L. (1970): Gabona-, liszt-, sütő- és tésztaipari vizsgálati módszerek. (Methods for testing quality in the cereal, flour, baking and pasta industry.) Mezőgazdasági Kiadó, Budapest. Gabona-, liszt-, sütő

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Karácsonyi, L. (1970): Gabona-, liszt-, sütő- és tésztaipari vizsgálati módszerek. (Methods for testing quality in the cereal, flour, baking and pasta industry.) Mezőgazdasági Kiadó, Budapest. Gabona-, liszt-, sütő

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