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Journal of Flow Chemistry
Authors: L. Zane Miller, James J. Rutowski, Jonathan A. Binns, Guillermo Orts-Gil, D. Tyler McQuade, and Jeremy L. Steinbacher

We present a rapid approach for forming monodisperse silica microcapsules decorated with metal oxide nanoparticles; the silica–metal oxide composites have a hierarchical architecture and a range of compositions. The details of the method were defined using titania precursors. Silica capsules containing low concentrations of titania (<1 wt. %) were produced via an interfacial reaction using a simple mesofluidic T-junction droplet generator. Increasing the titania content of the capsules was achieved using two related, flow-based postsynthetic approaches. In the first approach, a precursor solution containing titanium alkoxides was flowed through a packed-bed of capsules. The second approach provided the highest concentration of titania (3.5 wt. %) and was achieved by evaporating titanium precursor solutions onto a capsule packed-bed using air flow to accelerate evaporation. Decorated capsules, regardless of the method, were annealed to improve the titania crystallinity and analyzed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The photocatalytic properties were then compared to a commercial nanoparticulate titania, which the microcapsule-supported titania outperformed in terms of rate of degradation of an organic dye and recyclability. Finally, the generality of the flow-based surface decoration procedures was demonstrated by synthesizing several composite transition metal oxide–silica microparticle materials.

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Abstract  

Arsenazo III modified maghemite nanoparticles (A-MMNPs) was used for removing and preconcentration of U(VI) from aqueous samples. The effects of contact time, amount of adsorbent, pH and competitive ions was investigated. The experimental results were fitted to the Langmuir adsorption model in the studied concentration range of uranium (1.0 × 10−4–1.0 × 10−2 mol L−1). According to the results obtained by Langmuir equation, the maximum adsorption capacity for the adsorption of U(VI) on A-MMNPs was 285 mg g−1 at pH 7. The adsorbed uranium on the A-MMNPs was then desorbed by 0.5 mol L−1 NaOH solution and determined spectrophotometrically. A preconcentration factor of 400 was achieved in this method. The calibration graph was linear in the range 0.04–2.4 ng mL−1 (1.0 × 10−10–1.0 × 10−8 mol L−1) of U(VI) with a correlation coefficient of 0.997. The detection limit of the method for determination of U(VI) was 0.01 ng mL−1 and the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for the determination of 1.43 and 2.38 ng mL−1 of U(VI) was 3.62% and 1.17% (n = 5), respectively. The method was applied to the determination of U(VI) in water samples.

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Abstract  

Application of nanoparticles in nuclear medicine has aimed to develop diagnosis and therapeutic techniques. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) are expected to be useful for protection of healthy tissue from radiation-induced harm and could serve therapeutic function. Among a variety of cerium radioisotopes, 137mCe (T 1/2 = 34.4 h, IT (99.22%), β+ (0.779%)) could be a novel candidate radionuclide in the field of diagnosis owing to its appropriate half-life, 99.91% natural abundance of target and its intense gamma line at 254.29 keV. In this study, 137mCe excitation function via the natLa(p,3n) reaction was calculated by TALYS-1.2 and EMPIRE-3 codes. The excitation function calculations demonstrated that the natLa(p,3n)137mCe reaction leads to the formation of the 136/138Ce isotopic contamination in the 22–35 MeV energy range. Interestingly, the isotopic impurities of 137mCe could serve radio protector function. Overall results indicate that the cyclotron produced 137mCeO2 nanoparticles by irradiation of a target encompassing lanthanum oxide nanoparticles could be a potent alternative for conventional diagnostic radionuclides with simultaneous radioprotection capacity.

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To synthesize nickel(0) nanoparticles by wet chemical reduction using hydrazine with an average size distribution below 100 nm, two different reactor concepts were developed. With a cone channel nozzle, the reactant solutions were sprayed into a batch for further processing and reduction at elevated temperatures. Another concept uses a micro-coaxial injection mixer connected to a heated tube to establish a fully continuously operating reactor. To shorten the time for reduction of the nickel, salt temperatures up to 180 °C are applied. To avoid uncontrolled residence time, the whole system was pressurized up to 80 bar. Approximately 80 L reactant solution, i.e., 1 kg nickel(0) nanoparticles, could be processed within 30 h.

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Introduction In recent years, polymer–nanoparticle composite materials have attracted the interest of a number of researchers because of their synergistic and hybrid properties derived from several components [ 1 – 8

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follows: water-free FeCl 3 and TiO 2 nanoparticles prepared from the previous step, in equimolar ratio, were ground in an agate mortar until mixed fully. Then the thiophene monomer, in equimolar ratio, was added dropwise into the above mixture with

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Dendrimer-encapsulated Au/Ag alloy nanoparticles (Au/Ag DENs) were covalently attached to a monolayer-functionalized inner surface of glass microreactors. The influence of the bimetallic alloy structure and of the different metal ratios was investigated for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol using NaBH4. TheAu/Ag—dendrimer nanocomposite with a 1:1 Au/Ag metal ratio showed the highest activity as compared to othermetal ratios and to pure Ag and Au. The dendrimer template exerted a stabilizing effect for six consecutive days of use with almost no decrease in conversion. This strategy enables the screening and investigation of a variety of bimetallic nanocatalysts in continuous-flow microreactors.

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Éva Kiss-Tóth Dojcsák, Zoltán Ferenczi, Adrienn Szalai Juhász, Emőke Kiss-Tóth, Olivér Rácz, and Bertalan Fodor

779 787 Kolosnjaj-Tabi, J., Szwarc, H., Moussa, F.: In vivo toxicity studies of pristine carbon nanotubes: A review. In: Hashim, A.A. (ed.), The Delivery of Nanoparticles

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Abstract  

Orthorhombic structural perovskite NdCrO3 nanocrystals with size of 60 nm were prepared by microemulsion method, and characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, SEM, EDS and BET. The catalytic effect of the NdCrO3 for thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was investigated by DSC and TG-MS. The results revealed that the NdCrO3 nanoparticles had effective catalysis on the thermal decomposition of AP. Adding 2% of NdCrO3 nanoparticles to AP decreased the temperature of thermal decomposition by 87° and increased the heat of decomposition from 590 to 1073 J g−1. Gaseous products of thermal decomposition of AP were NH3, H2O, O2, HCl, N2O, NO, NO2 and Cl2. The mechanism of catalytic action was based on the presence of superoxide ion O2 on the surface of NdCrO3, and the difference of thermal decomposition of AP with 2% of NdCrO3 and pure AP was mainly caused by the different extent of oxidation of ammonium.

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High-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) method for the quantification of eugenol from nanostructured drug delivery systems was successfully developed and validated. The mobile phase consisted of n-hexane:acetone (7:3, v/v), and the densitometric scanning was performed in the absorbance mode at 280 nm. The method was valid with respect to linearity and range, accuracy, precision, specificity, detection limit (DL), and quantitation limit (QL). The linearity of the method was established by a correlation coefficient value of 0.9930 ± 0.0013. The precision was tested by checking intra-day (repeatability) and inter-day (intermediate precision) variations. The method was established to be precise by low relative standard deviation (RSD) values for different concentration of eugenol. The results of the recovery studies of eugenol from preanalyzed samples demonstrated the accuracy of the method. The specificity of the developed method for the analysis of eugenol in the nanoemulsion gel and nanoparticles samples was confirmed by comparing the spectra obtained in standard and sample analysis. The DL and QL were determined to be 31.41 and 95.17 ng band−1, respectively, for the HPTLC method. The forced degradation studies revealed on eugenol established the effectiveness of the developed and validated method. The developed and validated HPTLC method was found to be a stability-indicating one, as indicated by the results of forced degradation studies, for its use during the accelerated stability studies of the nanoemulsion gels and nanoparticles of eugenol.

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