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1976. Autosegmental phonology. Doctoral dissertation, MIT. Gussenhoven, Carlos 2004. The phonology of tone and intonation. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge

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In Balearic Catalan, first person singular present indicative verb forms do not show an explicit inflectional morph, as do most dialects of Catalan. Among these forms, we find final consonant clusters that involve a violation of the sonority constraint according to which the degree of sonority between the segments of a syllable must be decreasing in relation to the nucleus. The same clusters in nominal inflection are resolved by means of a process of vowel epenthesis. The exceptional phonological behavior of these consonant clusters is not circumscribed to sonority factors, but also concerns the regular phonology of the dialect, either because a general process fails to apply, or because a process applies though the conditions that make it applicable are not visible. Previous approaches have analyzed these final consonant clusters, not as codas, but as onsets of empty nuclei: this exceptional syllabic status would, according to these proposals, throw some light on this peculiar phonological behavior. In this paper we investigate the theoretical problems deriving from approaches of this kind and demonstrate that they are better analyzed by considering paradigmatic effects, such as uniformity and contrast between the members of a morphological paradigm. Furthermore, we critically review the different theories developed in Optimality Theory in order to account for surface resemblances and dissimilarities between the members of a paradigm and introduce a detailed formalization of Paradigmatic Contrast .

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Arsenijević, Boban — Marko Simonović in progress. Postcyclic stress is interface stress. Hammond, Michael 1989. Lexical stresses in macedonian and Polish. In: Phonology 6: 19

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Origins of sound change: Approaches to phonologization

Alan C. L. Yu (ed.): Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. pp xvi+338

Acta Linguistica Hungarica
Author: Krisztina Polgárdi

introduction to Element Theory 2011 Blevins, Juliette. 2004. Evolutionary phonology: The emergence of sound patterns. Cambridge

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Acta Linguistica Academica
Authors: Xiaoliang Luo and Guillaume Enguehard

Philippe Ségéral . 2005 . On phonological processes in the “3rd conjugation” of Somali . Folia orientalia 41 . 115 – 131 . Bendjaballah , Sabrina . 1999 . Trois figures

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Caramazza A., Miozzo M. 1997. The relation between syntactic and phonological knowledge in lexical access: evidence from the ’tip-of-the-tongue’ phenomenon: Cognition 64, 309–343. Miozzo M

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Balogné Bérces, Katalin 2001. ’Ambisyllabicity’ across word boundaries: A Strict CV Phonology approach. In: DOXIMP 6. Selected papers, 1–8. Elméleti Nyelvészet Program (ELTE), MTA Nyelvtudományi Intézet, Budapest

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Acta Linguistica Academica
Authors: Katalin Balogné Bérces and Shanti Ulfsbjorninn

The papers in the present collection have arisen from two instances of international collaboration. The first one happened in 2017, when a group of researchers working on aspects of phonological representation gathered in Budapest for that year

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This paper focuses on one fragment from Kurtág's Scenes from a Novel, a vocal cycle for soprano and isntrumental ensemble set to poems by Rimma Dalos. The structuralist analytical method of Iurii Lotman, Russia's foremost semiotician, is used to examine Dalos's text. It considers the phonological, prosodi, graphic, lexical, and grammatical levls of poetic structure. The author examines both vertucal and horizontal dimensions of the musical structure, borrowing the “wedge” idea from Davis Lewin. The incorporate these approaches, this fragment is considered as an independent musical entity, an independent poetic entity, and finalyy as a synthetic musico-poetic symbiosis.

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Abstract

The Hungarian words komor ‘gloomy’ and komoly ‘serious’ are of unknown origin. The present paper aims to elucidate this question from various angles: it gives an overview of what the Hungarian etymological dictionaries say on this topic, shows that komoly is a relatively late development out of komor, spread by the language reformers (especially by Ferenc Kazinczy) at the end of the 18th century, and presents the attempts to prove the Turkic origin of komor. Finally, it offers a Slavic etymology based on the Slavic stem *chmur-, demonstrates that semantically the two words match perfectly, and dissolves the phonological doubts that may arise at first sight.

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