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Earthquakes. Elsevier, Amsterdam Dams and Earthquakes Fujii Y 1995: Pageoph , 144, 19--37. Pageoph

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analytical approach from musicology, urban and memory studies. My research of the above-mentioned topics will be based on two main case studies: the earthquake in 1963 and its 50th anniversary in 2013, as well as the project “Skopje 2014” in the context of

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Gusev A A, Pavlov V 2006: In: First European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (a joint event of the 13th ECEE and 30th General Assembly of the ESC). Geneva, Paper Number 408. Hamzehloo H, Vaccari

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: Synthesis seismograms-III: P wave seismograms from earthquakes, Sci. Rep. BARC-193, 1-73. Douglas A 1967: P signal complexity and source radiation patterns, in Vesiac Report, 7885-X-X, University of Michigan

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Bisztricsány E 1974: Earthquake engineering (in Hungarian). Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest Bisztricsány E. Earthquake

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. U.S. NRC Regulatory Guide 1.208, A Performance-Based Approach to Define the Site-Specific Earthquake Ground Motion , March 2007. Akkar D. S., Gülkan P. Estimation of cumulative absolute velocity (CAV) from a recently

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Notes 1. Bergdoll's account starts with some basic and useful information: “Its ancient centre destroyed by a violent earthquake and tidal wave on All Saint's Day 1755, Lisbon become overnight the focus

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: W. Plastino, G. Panza, C. Doglioni, M. Frezzotti, A. Peccerillo, P. De Felice, F. Bella, P. Povinec, S. Nisi, L. Ioannucci, P. Aprili, M. Balata, M. Cozzella, and M. Laubenstein

Abstract  

The ability to predict earthquakes is one of the greatest challenges for Earth Sciences. Radon has been suggested as one possible precursor, and its groundwater anomalies associated with earthquakes and water–rock interactions were proposed in several seismogenic areas worldwide as due to possible transport of radon through microfractures, or due to crustal gas fluxes along active faults. However, the use of radon as a possible earthquake’s precursor is not clearly linked to crustal deformation. It is shown in this paper that uranium groundwater anomalies, which were observed in cataclastic rocks crossing the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory, can be used as a possible strain meter in domains where continental lithosphere is subducted. Measurements evidence clear, sharp anomalies from July, 2008 to the end of March, 2009, related to a preparation phase of the seismic swarm, which occurred near L’Aquila, Italy, from October, 2008 to April, 2009. On April 6th, 2009 an earthquake (Mw = 6.3) occurred at 01:33 UT in the same area, with normal faulting on a NW–SE oriented structure about 15 km long, dipping toward SW. In the framework of the geophysical and geochemical models of the area, these measurements indicate that uranium may be used as a possible strain meter in extensional tectonic settings similar to those where the L’Aquila earthquake occurred.

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Abstract  

Due to the subcrustal earthquakes located at the sharp bend of the Southeast Carpathians, Vrancea zone in Romania has a high potential seismic hazard in Europe. Among several seismic precursors, radon anomalies in air, ground, and groundwater in the epicentral areas can be associated with the strain stress changes that occurred before and after earthquakes. In order to support this theoretical view, the main aim of this paper was to investigate temporal variations of radon concentration levels in air near the ground and in ground air by the use of solid state nuclear track detectors CR-39 and LR-115 in relation with some seismic events at two seismic stations Vrancioaia and Plostina, located in Vrancea active region. This paper reports essentially the observation of radon concentration levels in the air near the ground at 1 m height for the earthquakes that occurred during the period of November 2010–October 2011 and moment magnitudes M w in the range of
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$2.0 \le M_{\text{w}} \le 4.9$$ \end{document}
. The average radon concentration in air above the ground measured with CR-39 detectors recorded for 1 year period in Vrancea area was 1,094.58 ± 150.3 Bq/m3 and 10 days fluctuations were placed in the range of 129 ± 40 Bq/m3 and 5,888 ± 700 Bq/m3. Also have been reported measurements of in soil radon concentrations in drill holes at 0.5 m depths during period of March 1977–October 1980, just after 4 March 1977, M w 7.4 Vrancea earthquake. The knowledge of air–ground–gas 222Rn anomalies is very important for earthquake pre-signals assessment as well as for precisely location of geologic active faults.
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. Structural Engineering 2003 129 978 988 Gluck J, Ribakov Y, Dancygier A 2000: Earthquake

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