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Bagi Z, Koller A: Lack of nitric oxide mediation of flow-dependent arteriolar dilation in type I diabetes is restored by sepiapterin. J. Vasc. Res. 40, 47–57 (2003

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Abstract  

FTIR spectrometry combined with TG provides information regarding mass changes in a sample and permits qualitative identification of the gases evolved during thermal degradation. Various fuels were studied: coal, peat, wood chips, bark, reed canary grass and municipal solid waste. The gases evolved in a TG analyser were transferred to the FTIR via a heated teflon line. The spectra and thermoanalytical curves indicated that the major gases evolved were carbon dioxide and water, while there were many minor gases, e.g. carbon monoxide, methane, ethane, methanol, ethanol, formic acid, acetic acid and formaldehyde. Separate evolved gas spectra also revealed the release of ammonia from biomasses and peat. Sulphur dioxide and nitric oxide were found in some cases. The evolution of the minor gases and water parallelled the first step in the TG curve. Solid fuels dried at 100C mainly lost water and a little ammonia.

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Abstract  

The electrochemical redox behavior of nitric acid was studied using a glassy carbon fiber column electrode system, and its reaction mechanism was suggested and confirmed in several ways. Electrochemical reactions in less than 2.0M nitric acid was not observed. However, in more than 2.0M nitric acid, the reduction of nitric acid to nitrous acid occurred and the reduction rate was slow so that the nitric acid solution had to be in contact with an electrode for a period of time long enough for an apparent reduction current of nitric acid to nitrous acid to be observed. The nitrous acid generated in more than 2.0M nitric acid was rapidly and easily reduced to nitric oxide by an autocatalytic reaction. Sulfamic acid was confirmed to be effective to destroy the nitrous acid. At least 0.05M sulfamic acid was necessary to scavenge the nitrous acid generated in 3.5M nitric acid.

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. Cardiol., 2012, 60 (18), 1778–1786. 16 Schulz, E., Jansen, T., Wenzel, P., et al.: Nitric oxide, tetrahydrobiopterin, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in

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273 31 941 Bal-Price, A., Brown, G. C. (2001) Inflammatory neurodegeneration mediated by nitric oxide from-activated glia-inhibiting neuronal

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Madácsy, L., Velősy, B., Szepes, A., et al.: Effect of nitric oxide on gallbladder motility in patients with acalculous biliary pain: a cholescintigraphic study. Dig. Dis. Sci., 2002, 47 , 1975–1981. Szepes A

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Agrokémia és Talajtan
Authors: György Heltai, Attila Anton, Sándor Hoffmann, Tibor Szili-Kovács, Katalin Berecz, Györgyi Kampfl, Krisztina Kristóf, Erik Molnár, Márk Horváth, and Ágnes Bálint

609 640 Davidson, E. A. & Kingerlee, W. , 1997. Global inventory of emissions of nitric oxide from soils: A literature review. Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems

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. Biagini A. Clerico 2003 Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphisms and risk of coronary artery disease Clin Chem

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Brenman, J. E., Chao, D. S., Xia, H., Aldape, K., Bredt, D. S. (1995) Nitric oxide synthase complexed with dystrophin and absent from skeletal muscle sarcolemma in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Cell 82 , 743

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Clemens, M. G.: Nitric oxide in liver injury. Hepatology, 1999, 30 , 1–5. Clemens M. G. Nitric oxide in liver injury Hepatology

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