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Abstract  

A rapid and accurate method to measure uranium was established using gamma spectroscopy with a high purity germanium detector. This can be done by measuring the gamma radiation intensity at 186 keV which corresponds to the concentration of 235U only since all the 226Ra which also shows a peak at this energy level, remains in the solid phosphogypsum. The method was proved to be accurate when compared with other methods. It has also the advantage of measuring uranium concentrations over a wide range suitable to the operation of the pilot plant for extraction of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid without the need to dilution or concentration. It can also measure the uranium in the different media such as acid, organic or alkaline media found in the pilot plant at different stages.

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Abstract  

In divalent tin halides, when the halogen is small and highly electronegative (F, Cl), the tin valence orbitals are hybridized, the tin(II) non-bonded electron pair is located on one of the hybrid orbitals, and the resulting large electric field gradient gives a large quadrupole splitting. The reaction of barium chloride and tin difluoride in aqueous solutions, for large BaCl2.2H2O/SnF2 ratios (>10) results in the precipitation of a white powdered material, which is identified by X-ray diffraction to be BaCIF. However, Tin-119 Mossbauer spectroscopy shows the material contains a fairly large amount of divalent tin in the Sn2+ ionic form, with unhybridized orbitals, like in SnCl2. Using X-ray diffraction, we have established that Sn2+ ions substitute 15% of the Ba2+ ions at random, and chemical analysis shows the material has the formula Ba5.66SnCl7.30F6.04 and thus is enriched in chlorine.

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Abstract  

A previous paper reported the application of a method for determining226Ra by -spectroscopy. This paper presents important improvements which permit the determination of226Ra in the presence of large amounts of Ca. The method was applied to the analysis of226Ra and U isotopes in fish samples from the waters of the Grand Canyon.226Ra ranged from 0.05 Bq kg–1 /1.4 pCi kg–1/ to 0.17 Bq k–1 /4.7 pCi kg–1/.238U values ranged from 0.13 Bq kg–1 /3.5 pCi kg–1/ to 0.52 Bq kg–1 /14 pCi kg–1/ and234U values were between 0.23 Bq kg–1 /6.2 pCi kg–1/ and 12 Bq kg–1/ /326. pCi kg–1/.

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Abstract  

The Budapest Research Reactor’s Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) and Neutron-Induced Prompt gamma Spectroscopy (NIPS) facilities were significantly upgraded during the last few years. The higher neutron flux, achieved by the partial replacement and realignment of the neutron guides, made feasible the automation and specialization of the two experimental stations. A new neutron flux monitor, computer-controlled beam shutters and a low-level counting chamber have been put into operation to assist with in-beam activation experiments. An automatic sample changer has been installed at the PGAA station, while the NIPS station was redesigned and upgraded with a Compton suppressor to use for the non-destructive analysis of bulky samples. In the near future the latter setup will be completed with a neutron tomograph and a moving table, to turn it into a Neutron Radiography/Tomography-driven PGAA equipment.

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Summary The reaction of a hydrated nitrate salt of lanthanide (Ln=Pr, Nd, Gd, Dy, Er) with the polyfunctional ligand salicylhydroxamic acid (H3sha), in the presence of base, afforded solid compounds, insoluble in common organic solvents and in water. The new complexes characterized by means of elemental analyses (C, H, N, Ln), magnetic moment determinations and spectroscopic data (IR, MS). It is proposed that they are neutral, with a possible polymeric structure of the general type: [Ln2(Hsha)2(H2sha)(DMF)x(CH3O)(H2O)]n×2H2O Their thermal decomposition was studied in nitrogen and/or oxygen atmosphere, between 25-1000°C by using simultaneous TG/DTG-DTA technique. The IR spectroscopy used to determine the intermediates and the final products. The intermediates at 180°C suggest the formation of N-hydroxylactam complex, which upon further heating gives a carbonaceous residue of Ln2O3 at 1000°C in nitrogen, while in oxygen the stable oxides are formed at 600°C.

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Abstract  

119Sn conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) were employed to investigate microstructure, composition and phases present in as-electroplated Sn-Cr and Sn-Cr-Zn alloys deposited on copper substrates. In the Sn-Cr deposits Cu, -Sn, Cr-Sn phases can be identified by X-ray diffractometry. The phase composition is significantly different between the samples prepared with relatively higher and lower current densities. In the diffractograms of Sn-Cr-Zn deposits Cu, -Sn, Zn phases can be well identified. A small intensity amorphous peak is also present, which can perhaps be associated with the presence of some amorphous Zn and Sn alloy. 119Sn Mössbauer spectra of Sn-Cr deposits exhibit an asymmetric broad main line centered near the isomer shift characteristic of -Sn as well as they contain a small component near the zero velocity which can be attributed to a SnO2 phase based upon its characteristic. 119Sn Mössbauer spectra of Sn-Cr-Zn deposits are roughly similar to those of Sn-Cr deposits although the Mössbauer parameters of the third phase are different and vary with the Zn content. The presence of SnO2 on the surface mainly in the Sn-Cr samples can be attributed to the corrosion process in the air.

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Abstract  

57Fe-conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) — a sensitive tool to analyze the phase composition of corrosion products on the surface of stainless steel — was applied to study real specimens from the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary. The primary circuit side of the heat exchanger tubes was studied on selected samples cut out from the steam generators during regular maintenance. Mostly Cr-and Ni-substituted magnetite, amorphous Fe-oxides/oxyhydroxides as well as the signal of bulk austenitic steel of the tubes were detected. The level of Cr-and Ni-substitution in the magnetite phase could be estimated from the Mössbauer spectra. It is suggested that Cr-Ni substitution occurs simultaneously so that the inverse spinel structure of magnetite is preserved up to a certain limit which appears to be roughly at [Fe3+]tet[Fe2+ 1/4Ni2+ 3/4Fe3+ 1/4Cr3+ 3/4]octO4. Further decrease of the iron content of this phase results in the formation of nickel chromite of regular spinel structure, with very low Fe content. This transformation may be responsible for the hybrid structure of the protective oxide layer, being substantially accelerated by previously performed, factory developed and proposed AP-CITROX decontamination cycles.

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Abstract  

The interactions of CO with a high specific surface area tin dioxide was investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. FTIR study of CO interactions have shown that CO can adsorb on cus (coordinatively unsaturated sites) Sn4+ cation sites (band at 2201 cm-1). In addition, CO reacts with surface oxygen atoms. This leads to the partial reduction of SnO2 surface and to the formation of ionised oxygen vacancies together with the release of free electrons, which are responsible for the loss of transmission. Formed CO2 can chemisorb on specific surface sites: on basic sites to form carbonates species and on acidic sites (Sn4+-CO2 species) which is in competition with the formation of Sn4+-CO species. TG experiment have shown that the reduction of SnO2 by CO at 400°C occurs in two steps. First, the reduction of SnO2 surface, which is a quick phenomenon. This has allowed to evaluate that more than 12% of reducible surface oxygens can react with CO, essentially because of the presence of a large amount of surface hydroxyl groups. The second step of the reduction of SnO2 would be the progressive reduction of SnO2 bulk by the slow diffusion of oxygen atoms from the bulk to the surface.

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The feasibility of NIR spectroscopy for determining chemical composition of goose fatty liver was studied. The spectra of 50 fresh, homogenized liver samples (ether extract content EE=53.2, SD=4.87%) were taken between 1100 and 2500 nm in reflectance mode, then the chemical composition and the fatty acid profile was measured (gas chromatography). Calibration equations were developed using modified partial least-squares regression. The R 2 value in estimation of DM, CP and total EE were 0.72, 0.63 and 0.81, respectively. For the major fatty acids (oleic, palmitic and stearic acid, 51.4, 25.8 and 15.5% of total) the R² values were 0.94, 0.93 and 0.16. The estimation of the total saturated fatty acid (SAT) proportion and the so-called unsaturation index (UI) value was effective (R 2 =0.81 and 0.79, respectively). The paper demonstrates the usefulness of the NIRS method as a fast and solvent free alternative of liver qualification. For practical purposes a larger number of fatty liver samples are needed.

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Abstract  

Two complimentary spectroscopic techniques, X-ray absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy have been conducted at spatial scales of 1 to 25 μm on uranium contaminated soil sediments collected from two former nuclear materials processing facilities of the DOE: Fernald, OH and Savannah River Site, SC. A method of imbedding particles in a non-reactive Si polymer was developed such that individual particles could be examined before and after extraction with a wide range of chemicals typically used in sequential extraction techniques and others proposed forex situ chemical intervention technologies. Using both the micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and micro-X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) techniques, both elemental and oxidation state distribution maps were generated on individual particles before and following chemical extraction. XANES can determine the relative proportion of U(VI) and U(IV) in phases comprising individual particles before and after extraction and showed that greater than 85% of the uranium existed as hexavalent U(VI). Fluorescence spectra of contaminated particles containing mainly U(VI) revealed populations of uranyl hydroxide phases and demonstrated the relative efficacy and specificity of each extraction method. Correlation of XAS and fluorescence data at micron scales provides information of U oxidation state as well as chemical form in heterogeneous samples.

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