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ILVESTRE , J. , G AUTHIER , L. & P INELLI , E. , 2015 . Environmentally relevant approaches to assess nanoparticles ecotoxicity: A review . Journal of Hazardous Materials . 283 . 764 – 777

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non-metallic nanoparticles in the various base fluids to produce “nanofluid”. All categories aimed to improve heat transfer and decrease heat losses by minimizing the thermal boundary condition and increasing the turbulent flow of the fluid flow, which

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studies on the formation processes of anatase nanoparticles, onto different polymers including cellulose surface at relatively low temperatures, have been published [ 15 – 26 ]. Among these, the following processes can be highlighted to obtain: (a) self

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Reaction Kinetics, Mechanisms and Catalysis
Authors: Susana Pinto-Castilla, Santiago Marrero, Yraida Díaz, Joaquín L. Brito, Pedro Silva, and Paulino Betancourt

) because of the ozone attack. Catalyst preparation Supported vanadium nanoparticles were prepared using a modification of the procedure described elsewhere [ 8 ]. A solution of K[BEt 3 H] (1.0 M, 4.6 ml, 4.6 mmol) in

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performance are closely related to the state of metal species, metal-substrate interactions and specific substrate. In the present work, we found that silver metal nanoparticles have a unique role in promoting the photocatalytic performance of BiOBr catalyst

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Reaction Kinetics, Mechanisms and Catalysis
Authors: Mohammad Saleh Ghodrati, Mohammad Haghighi, Jafar Sadegh Soltan Mohamdzadeh, Behzad Pourabas, and Ehsan Pipelzadeh

the pollutant. Recently, some reports have pointed out that the degradation of organic compounds is induced by visible light when the nanoparticles are incorporated with other semiconductors or metals. Therefore, the great interest is to use solar

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nanoparticles can not only cause a restriction to the polymer chain mobility by inducing an immobilized layer, but also has been demonstrated to have a significant effect on the crystallization kinetics through changing crystal nucleation and growth. It has been

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: A. Kyritsis, A. Spanoudaki, C. Pandis, L. Hartmann, R. Pelster, N. Shinyashiki, J. C. Rodríguez Hernández, J. L. Gómez Ribelles, M. Monleón Pradas, and P. Pissis

is particularly attractive. In this case, the hydrogel matrix is reinforced by nanoparticles, such as clays [ 10 – 12 ] or silica [ 12 ], taking advantage of the well-established significant improvement of mechanical properties of polymer

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Abstract  

Sentinel lymph node detection is widely used to identify lymph nodes that receive lymphatic drainage from a primary tumor. 99mTc labeled iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared to invent a new colorful radioactive agent for sentinel lymph node detection. Iron oxide nanoparticles were produced by co-precipitation of FeCl3 and FeCl2 in the presence of NaOH. Then iron oxide nanoparticles were labeled with 99mTc. 99mTc labeled nanoparticles (7.4 MBq/0.1 mL) were intradermally injected in the distal hind limb of 16 rabbits. Dynamic and static lymphoscintigraphic images were taken for 24 h. Labeling efficiencies of 99mTc-iron oxide nanoparticles were over 99%. Their sizes are between 50 and 60 nm. 99mTc-iron oxide nanoparticles were accumulated in the popliteal lymph node in 11 of 16 rabbits (69%). Retention of nanoparticles in the popliteal lymph node was obvious at from 2nd through 24th hours. The radioactive lymph node was identified easily by gamma probe. The popliteal lymph node was excised and established for radioactivity and black dye. These black and radioactive nanoparticles may be potential agent successfully used for sentinel lymph node detection.

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Abstract  

Colloidal Cu–Al nanoparticles were prepared in an aqueous polyvinyl alcohol solution containing copper chloride and aluminum chloride as precursors, isopropanol as a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals, and distilled water as a solvent. The gamma irradiations were carried out in a 60Co gamma source chamber with different doses up to 120 kGy. The formation of Cu–Al nanoparticles has been observed initially by the change in color of the colloidal samples from colorless to brown. The nanoparticles properties were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and UV–Vis spectrophotometer. At a constant Cu/Al molar ratio, size of the nanoparticles can be well controlled by varying the precursors concentration and radiation dose. The average particle diameter increases with increase of precursors concentration and decreases with increase of dose. This is owing to the competition between nucleation process, aggregation process, and ions association in the formation of nanoparticles during irradiation.

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