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Abstract

In the midst of an increasingly global culture it is necessary to construct a local narrative because nobody else but local scholars will construct it. If, for example, the history of Hungarian Modernism is described in the terms of the West European artistic currents only, as a journey from realism to impressionism and post-impressionism to art nouveau to symbolism to expressionism, cubism, constructivism and so forth, as we have been doing it for decades, some of the most significant Hungarian artists are remaining unacknowledged. There is hardly any international category for Egry, Vajda, Farkas, Kondor or Veszelszky, to mention but a few names; but even those Hungarian artists who more or less fit into the above stylistic brackets are getting a simplified reading and understanding. It is the collective task of local art historians to construct their distinctive narrative.

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In Carlos Fuentes's work we can witness, as with many other Boom writers, the proposal of a novel innovation through subverting traditional writing genres. Specifically, in La Muerte de Artemio Cruz, there seems to be an opposition between the narrative voice Tú and the narrative voices Yo and Él in order to establish a destruction of the conventional autobiographical discourse that the last two represent. In addition, Tú openly denounces the chingada, an essential element of the Mexican social life which Yo and Él defend and justify, so Fuentes goes beyond the proposed stylistic goal. Otherwise, after Aura, where the author introduces the tú form for the first time, the complex plot of Artemio Cruz's agony results in the success of the New Latin American Novel.

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Chinese infrastructural projects like the “Belt & Road Initiative” or the “Chinese 16 + 1 Initiative” are trapped in geopolitical narratives. Geopolitical concepts dressed in scientific robes make the logic of warfare begin to prevail over the logic of cooperation. As a consequence, something that was to be an opportunity for less developed countries, becomes the axis of conflict between the great powers. In this paper, I identify the logic of warfare as an underlining characteristic of geopolitical reasoning and show why it is incompatible with economic approach. I also argue that geopolitical concepts are not scientific theories, but rather self-fulfilling prophecies. This theoretical background allows to detect the biggest obstacles related to many Chinese initiatives, and also indicates some necessary means to neutralize geopolitical narratives.

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Abstract

Albasty is one of the most commonly known malevolent beings among Turkic peoples from the Altay Mountains via the Caucasus and up as far as the Volga River. This article focuses on Turkic data from the Volga region (Chuvash, Tartar, Bashkir) and the Eurasian Steppe (Kazak, Kyrgyz, Nogay, Uzbek). Various areas can be ascertained on the basis of verbal charms and folk-belief narratives. On the Eurasian Steppe, for example, Albasty was first and foremost a puerperal demon. In this territory, specialists (kuuču) were called in to keep away or oust the demon at birth. Many recorded legends and memorates concern healing methods and the process of becoming a healer. In contrast, epic texts or narratives are rarer,in the Volga region, yet there are certain verbal incantations against the Albasty, which here is rather a push or disease demon.

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What is ἀργός? Whiteness? Luminosity? Or, simply a range of bright shades? Having undertaken an on-going research project on the perception of colour-sense in antiquity that explores colour’s metaphorical function(s) and its social role, in this paper I shed light on bright shades in the Iliad, mainly ἀργός, and examine their contexts to investigate how the poet employs ἀργός in developing a richer narrative, including character portrayal. How are various appearances of ἀργός composed and interconnected? How do they metaphorically affect their contexts? What do they symbolise within the narrative? Through detailed analysis, I show that ἀργός, being appropriately selected to contribute to each context as a significant indicator, plays an important role in brightening the context, effectively and picturesquely.

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In this paper I argue that the subtext for Ovid's positive portrayal of Diomedes at Rem. 151-167 is the Vergilian episode of Diomedes' reply to the embassy of the Latins (Aen. 11.252-93), and that the adjustment of this episode to the frame of Ovid's erotic didactic is achieved through a number of similarities in diction and theme. Ovid's treatment of the Vergilian Diomedes, however, is subversive and the Vergilian narrative is being undermined and reworked in a brand new way.

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In my paper I analyse the narrative of Livy about the Bacchanalia conspiracy. Our author, who is short with some events, dedicates twelve long chapters to this happening, that is, he regards it as important. In his report we can establish more different sources: the accounts of earlier historians, the decree of the senat (Senatus consultum de Bacchanalibus) and rumours. In spite of his loyalty to the traditional Roman religion, his decription is reliable.

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In Livy XXI 45. 8 Hannibal makes a promise to his soldiers, confirming it by a rite very similar to the one performed by the fetials when making a treaty. The main difference is that Hannibal uses a lamb instead of a pig. The author of the paper investigates how and why this motive could come into being, and how it could fit into the narrative of the second Punic war in Livy’s source.

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In this paper, I establish a connection between the manifold character of Fama as reported by Virgil in Aen. 4. 173 ff. and her ‘manifold speech’ (multiplex sermo) in the framework of a narratological reading. According to my interpretation, the short fama of the Virgilian Fama (4. 191-194), as a spectacular example of ‘polyphonic narrative’, radicalises and thus domesticates the dangers inherent in the epic discourse itself.

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In this paper, the author studies the sources about the activity of Brun of Querfurt in Kiev. The narrative sources are well-known but on the basis of the new edition of the text it is possible to formulate new questions and give some new interpretations. But because of the few number of sources and short texts the results of these new analyses could be only hypotheses.

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