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The present paper examines the crucial passages in Lucanus, Valerius Flaccus, Statius and Sily concerning suicide. Lucanus presents a fanatical eulogy of suicide, Valerius Flaccus a rather calculated approach which is guided by almost philosophical considerations resembling those given by the philosopher Seneca, Statius focuses on the problem of self determination and tyranny. Sily’s account of the Saguntine suicide combines and modifies different elements of the literary tradition, which sometimes makes it difficult to ascertain the value judgement his narrative is meant to convey to his readers.

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Tonal residua and other remnants of older musical styles and idioms seem to be inevitably bound to Ligeti’s musical language. The numerous ways of integrating the stylistic heterogeneity in his works are extremely individual and may be seen as part of each work’s specific narrative. In his early essay about musical form, Ligeti interprets Adorno’s idea of material as a parameter of form either as congealed time or as traces of musical memory. This article aims to show the different levels and qualities of musical thought Ligeti deals with by analyzing the different layers of traditional strata in his music.

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The study examines some questions concerning interpretations of Slovak art in the 1960s, employing the analysis of essays by the writer Dominik Tatarka (1913–1989) on fine art. I have chosen these texts, which tie into the tradition of irrational, emphatic writing and the interpretation of artworks, because their analysis unveils the workings of the national myth on visual art. Reliving the myths linked to popular narratives marks out the cultural space of Central Europe. Put in more general terms, I will address the specific relation between modernism and anachronism, particularly between progressive humanist thinking on modern culture on the one hand and national mythology on the other hand.

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This paper focuses on ``the passage'', the key term and key place of the setting in Marguerite Duras's “L'Amant”: namely the apartment where the couple in love meets and finds their shelter. This place acts on the one hand as the space of communication (whether verbal or nonverbal), which contributes to the continual formation of the female character's identity in the text. On the other hand, ``the passage'' is understood and analysed as the narrative strategy (that is, the organization or the composition of the text) of this prose with autobiographical features. Moreover, ``le métissage linguistique'' manifested in “L'Amant” is illustrated and commented on.

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This paper initiates an exploration into contemporary Greek literature for young adults and more specifically, literary texts with a social dimension. Contemporary Greek writers deliberately address social issues in a realistic manner by presenting all the different facets of Alterity: xenophobia, ethnocentrism, racism. Today these narratives pose new questions and attempt to familiarize the young public with an image of the Other, the Foreigner, the Different. The writers focus on the positive aspects of multiculturalism in contemporary societies in hopes of discrediting stereotypical images of the Other that continue to prevail in the collective imagination, to sensitize the public and ultimately to abolish the fault lines of bigotry.

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Sheridan Le Fanu was an Irish writer in the Gothic tradition, an innovator of the genre of the supernatural tale, and master story-teller, whose use of language we examine here; his use of the core linguistic features of words, syntax and sounds for literary expression and his use of narrative and dialogue and of the registers (speech and written styles) and dialects of his speech community for a sense of realism and authenticity. We also examine the difference between written and the spoken language, and the way Le Fanu imparted to the written word the features of the Irish oral story-telling tradition.

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Narratological interplay

What literary criticism can learn from computer gaming studies

Neohelicon
Author: Hans-Joachim Backe

Abstract  

The article discusses the future role of narrative computer games in the academic canon. As a popular part of everyday culture, this medium is coming to the attention of several disciplines at the same time. Especially comparative literature studies has to face the question of how to deal with computer games, whether to ignore them, to treat them marginally, or to even incorporate them. This article outlines the major challenges as well as the possible benefits of their inclusion into the systematical and theoretical scope of comparative literature.

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The Comparative History of European Literatures, published by John Benjamins, includes five volumes on Romanticism which culminate with comprehensive studies of the non-fictional and the fictional prose of the period. All five volumes document Romanticism as a pan-European movement sharing literary motifs and topoi across national boundaries. Of special significance in the last two volumes is the close examination of genre new to the period and the rapidity with which new forms of non-fictional prose influenced corresponding innovation in fictional narrative. Prominent among the emergent forms of prose fiction were the detective story, the Bildungsroman, the Gothic tale and the case study of mental pathology.

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The essay tackles a tripartite phenomenon: (1) the ways in which “la gastronomie”, as a generative cipher of societal norms and cultural prerogatives, has evolved from the 19th to the 20th century; (2) the residual effects of this evolution or “difference”, which, in the sphere of textuality, largely over-determines poetic and narrative structures in literary works; and (3) the impact and consequences upon writers of the post-modern era as they come to grips with the paradoxes of contemporaneity and as they struggle to negotiate earlier texts.

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With roots in the Old World and fertile ground in the New World, the tall tale ourished in America, especially within the boasting, expansive atmosphere of the American frontier (Burrison 1991: 6–7). Hunting, fishing, weather, domestic life, and agriculture were popular topics, and opportunities for artful exaggeration were numerous. This paper examines the tall tale as artistic folk humor in which the narrative is carefully constructed and performed for best effect. Field recordings, printed texts, and folklore-archive texts will provide examples for analysis. Finally, examples of tall-tale postcards add a visual dimension to the genre.

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