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autoregressive model . Biometrika 85 : 413 – 426 10.1093/biomet/85.2.413 . Chen , Y-S 2011 Using patent analysis to explore corporate growth . Scientometrics 88 2 433 – 448 10.1007/s

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Abstract  

The aim of this study is to reveal the research growth, the distribution of research productivity and impact of genetic engineering research in Japan, Korea and Taiwan by taking patent bibliometrics approach. This study uses quantitative methods adopt from bibliometrics to analyze the patents granted to Japan, Korea and Taiwan by United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) from 1991 to 2002. In addition to patent and citation count, Bradford’s Law is applied to identify core assignees in genetic engineering. Patent coupling approach is taken to further analyze the patents granted to the core assignees to enclose the correlations among the core assignees. 13,055 genetic engineering patents were granted during the period of 1991 to 2002. Japan, Korea and Taiwan own 841 patents and Japan owns most of them. 270 assignees shared 841 patents and 16 core assignees are identified by the Bradford’s Law. 18,490 patents were cited by the 13,055 patents and 1,146 out of the 18,490 cited patents were granted to Japan, Korea and Taiwan. The results show Japan performs best in productivity and research impact among three countries. The core assignees are also Japan based institutions and four technical clusters are identified by patent coupling.

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Abstract  

The characteristics of Indian and Chinese patenting activity in the US patent system are examined by delineating two categories of patents; ‘nationally assigned’, and ‘invented not nationally assigned’ patents (not-nationally assigned patents in short). Further within the above two categories, patents are distinguished and analysed in terms of patent types: utility, design, and plant patents. Indian patents are mainly of utility type whereas China's activity falls in both utility and design.In the ‘nationally assigned’ patents, the different types of institutions involved and linkages are much higher for China. However, ‘not-nationally assigned’ patents of both the countries are dominated by industry and inter-institutional collaborations are sparse. Patents addressing technology sectors (analysis based on utility patents) do not exhibit major differences between the two categories in Chinese patents and address with varying degree all technology sectors. Unlike China, India's ‘nationally assigned’ patents are concentrated in chemical and drugs & medical whereas their ‘not-nationally assigned’ patents are similar to that of China in addressing technology sectors. In design patents, Chinese ‘nationally assigned’ patents mainly cover ornamental design of lighting equipments whereas their ‘not-nationally assigned’ patents are mainly in design equipment for production, distribution or transformation of energy. Further, few firms are active in design patents in both the categories. India's design activity is insignificant in both the categories. The paper concludes by examining the results in the policy context.

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Summary This paper uses United States patent classification analysis to study the development of core technologies and key industries in Taiwan over the last 25 years, from 1978 to 2002. After counting the number of Taiwan-held United States granted utility patents, the authors divide the years into three phases: from 1978 to 1994, with less than 500 patents each year; from 1995 to 1999, with 500-2,500 patents each year; from 2000 to 2002, with annual patents greater than 2,500. The results show that for both Taiwan’s core technologies and key industries, there was a great diversity at the first phase, while a mainstream forms and matures at the second and the third phases. However, industrial development at the third phase was more concentrated and focused than previous ones. Overall, Taiwan has clearly moved from a manufacturing-based economy to an innovation-based one, with its focus on high-tech industries during the previous 25 years.

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, particularly of institutional IP, provides an indicator of the potential economic impact of inventions (Parent et al. 2003 ). A good patent searching strategy is a prerequisite to patent analysis and technology trends. By using appropriate search

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principles. Liang et al. ( 2009a ) also suggested a computer-aided approach for product technology maturity forecasting using text-mining and patent analysis technologies based on the concept of function . Another approach is to use the SAO model

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the whole set of patents can be organized by an algorithm that uses a mapping base and co-occurrence matrices ( Fig. 5 ). Fig. 5 An algorithm for building IPFN of the whole set of patents

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Scientometrics
Authors: Jun Yuan, Wei Yue, Cheng Su, Zheng Wu, Zheng Ma, Yun Pan, Nan Ma, Zhi Hu, Fei Shi, Zheng Yu, and Yi Wu

Abstract  

This research intends to investigate the patent activity on water pollution and treatment in China (1985–2007), and then compares the results with patents data about Triadic patents, South Korea, Brazil and India over the same periods, patents data were collected from Derwent World Patents Index between 1985 and May 2008. For this study, 169,312 patents were chosen and examined. Total volume of patents, technology focus, assignee sector, priority date and the comparison with other countries are analyzed. It is found that patents on water pollution and treatment filed at China have experienced a remarkable increase and the increase rate of patents filed at China change simultaneous with the percentage of domestic applications. However, the number of high quality Triadic patents with priority country as China remains small. Furthermore, in addition to individual patent assignees, both Chinese universities and enterprises also play important roles in patent activity of water pollution and treatment. In addition, the pattern of South Korea’s development can provide short-term implications for China and the regularity in Triadic patents’ development can provide some guidance to China’s long-term development. In contrast, the development pattern of Brazil and India is less influential to China’s development. Furthermore, China’s technology focuses on water pollution and treatment seem to parallel global and triadic patent trends. This research provides a comprehensive picture of China’s innovation capability in the area of water pollution and treatment. It will help China’s local governments to improve their regional S&T capability and will provide support the National Water Pollution Control and Treatment Project in China.

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Abstract  

This study utilizes neural network to explore the nonlinear relationships between corporate performance and the patent traits measured from Herfindahl-Hirschman Index of patents (HHI of patents), patent citations, and relative patent position in the most important technological field (RPPMIT) in the US pharmaceutical industry. The results show that HHI of patents and RPPMIT have nonlinearly and monotonically positive influences upon corporate performance, while the influence of patent citations is nonlinearly U-shaped. Therefore, pharmaceutical companies should raise the degrees of the leading position in their most important technological fields and the centralization of their technological capabilities to enhance corporate performance.

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Introduction Patent documents constitute up-to-date and reliable source of knowledge for reflecting technological advance, so patent analysis has been widely used for identification of technological trends and formulation of

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