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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: R. Zeisler, S. B. Clark, S. J. Parry, G. R. Choppin, S. B. Clark, P. R. Danesi, S. J. Parry, M. Rossbach, C. Williamson, Zhifang Chai, R. Zeisler, S. J. Parry, and S. F. Heller- Zeisler

Summary  

Since the 1970's, concern about the training of radiochemists in the US has been increasing along with the age of nuclear work force, while the number of academic institutions offering undergraduate courses and the number of radiochemistry faculty has been steadily decreasing. To address this problem, a summer program has been offered through the American Chemical Society to undergraduates since 1984. Students compete nationally for this opportunity, and those selected receive a 3,000 stipend. In addition, all other expenses are paid. In this manuscript, the curriculum is described, along with the need for additional training programs and their impact.

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, I. Vovk , V. Glavnik , J. Chromatogr. A (in press, accepted manuscript 2017 ) doi: 10.1016/j.chroma. 2017.09.070. [54] H.J. Chen , B

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Penicillins and cephalosporins (subclasses of β-lactam antibiotics) are widely used against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Use of HPLC, TLC-bioautography, and thin silica gel layers precoated with fluorescent material has been reported in literature for the analysis of these compounds. This manuscript deals with a straightforward and sensitive method for rapid separation and detection of selected β-lactams. Bulk impregnation of homemade silica gel G layers and impregnation of ready made silica gel 60 layers with 0.2% ammonium chloride was carried out and various mobile phases have been established for UV detection of the compounds. Separation of penicillins (benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, and amoxicillin) and cephalosporins (cephalexin, cefoperazone, ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefadroxil) was achieved by use of propanol-acetic acid 4:1 ( v/v ) and butanol-acetic acid-water 4:1:2 ( v/v ) respectively, as mobile phases.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: R. Brodzinski, R. Runkle, J. Hartman, E. Ashbaker, M. Douglas, D. Jordan, K. McCormick, W. Sliger, and L. Todd

Abstract  

Migration of groundwater contamination from beneath the Hanford Site into the Columbia River creates a need for in situ 90Sr monitoring. The prototype monitor discussed here was designed for deployment downwell and provides near-real-time determination of the 90Sr concentration in a two-liter groundwater sample. This manuscript discusses the design, construction and preliminary results for a prototype monitor. Calibration and testing results of the as-built system show qualitative agreement between simulated predictions and experimental results. Downwell and laboratory tests demonstrate a sensitivity to 90Sr at concentrations below 8 pCi/l (0.3 Bq/1) at a 90% confidence level in measurement times of less than four hours.

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Abstract  

The preparation of performance testing (PT) materials for environmental and radiobioassay applications involves the use of natural matrix materials containing the analyte of interest, the addition (spiking) of the analyte to a desired matrix (followed by blending for certain matrices) or a combination of the two. The distribution of the sample analyte concentration in a batch of PT samples will reflect the degree of heterogeneity of the analyte in the PT material and/or the reproducibility of the sample preparation process. Commercial and government implemented radioanalytical performance evaluation programs have a variety of acceptable performance criteria. The performance criteria should take into consideration many parameters related to the preparation of the PT materials including the within and between sample analyte heterogeneity, the accuracy of the quantification of an analyte in the PT material and to what "known" value will a laboratory's result be compared. This manuscript discusses how sample preparation parameters affect the successful participation in performance evaluation (PE) programs having an acceptance criteria established as a percent difference from a "known" value or in PE programs using other acceptance criteria, such as the guidance provided in ANSI N42.22 and N13.30.

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In the present manuscript, freshly prepared and also pure chemical grade (BDH) antimony trioxide specimens were investigated. Numerous measurements were carried out on these specimens, comprising chemical, spectral and X-ray analyses, pycnometric and X-ray density measurements and observations of the behaviour of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor (∈′ and ∈″) as functions of temperature and frequency. The results obtained gave values of 12.4 and 10 for the dielectric constant for the freshly prepared and commercial antimony trioxide specimens, respectively. The results were compared in correlation with the phase constitution and degree of compactness for both specimens. Finally, the data are discussed on the basis of the interactions of the field frequency and temperature with the electric dipoles and electronic polarization of the test specimens.

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Abstract  

This chapter of the Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry contains selected papers presented at the European Conference on Calorimetry and Thermal Analysis for Environment (ECCTAE 2005) organised by the Centre of Excellence TALES (Thermodynamic Laboratory for Environmental Purposes), Institute of Physical Chemistry of Polish Academy of Sciences and held under the auspices of Prof. Janusz Lipkowski, the Vice-President of the Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS). The Conference took place on September 6–11, 2005 in the Conference and Holiday Centre ‘Antałwka’ in Zakopane, Poland. In the past, the first International Conference on the Calorimetry and Thermodynamics was organized by the Institute of Physical Chemistry of PAS in 1969 in Warsaw. This conference was dedicated to Prof. Wojciech Świętosławski, the late outstanding thermodynamic scientist who died on April 29, 1968. He was one of the most prominent Polish physicochemist and the first director general of the Institute of Physical Chemistry of PAS, which had been founded in 1965. In effect of the successful performance of such conference, the Institute of Physical Chemistry organized later the four National Conferences on Calorimetry and Thermal Analysis in Zakopane from 1973 to 1988. The Organizing Chairman was Prof. Wojciech Zielenkiewicz, the Corresponding Member of the Polish Academy of Sciences, who also initiated to create the Polish Society of Calorimetry and Thermal Analysis (PTKAT) with the name of Prof. Wojciech Świętosławski. Later, from 1991 to 2003, the next five Conferences on Calorimetry and Thermal Analysis of the PTKAT was also organized in Zakopane by Prof. L. Stoch of the University of Science and Technology (AGH) of Krakow, by Prof. H. Piekarski of the University of Łdź, Prof. A. Małecki of the University of Science and Technology (AGH), and Prof. A. Książczak of the Warsaw University of Technology. In these organizations, the Institute of Physical Chemistry of PAS also participated. The aim of the Conference ECCTAE 2005 was to bring together all scientists interested in the calorimetry and thermal analysis applied for environmental purposes and came from the academy, universities, laboratories, industries, agencies, etc. Finally, 92 participants from eleven countries (Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, France, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Sweden, United Kingdom, and Poland) took part in the Conference. The scientific program of the ECCTAE with 16 plenary lectures, 14 lectures and 53 posters reflected the most recent developments in the field of science and supplied many new results on environment and biochemistry, organic and inorganic. Calorimetry and thermal analysis play the major role in investigations on new materials for environment and biochemistry. New experimental techniques like solution, surfactant, combustion and hazard calorimetry, hazard thermal analysis, etc. are of the utmost importance. Finally, I would like to thank all the participants in the Conference and the authors for the careful preparation of their presentations and manuscripts in this special chapter of the Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry. I would also like to thank the best to all co-workers of the Organizing Committee. Hopefully, all of the participants from several countries enjoyed the wonderful days of this Conference in the beautiful place of Zakopane.

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This is yet another special issue of JTAC devoted to the presentation of selected papers drawn from results and discussions presented during an International Conference to the wider scientific community. The contents of this specific issue were delivered at the 7th Mediterranean Conference on Calorimetry and Thermal Analysis (MEDICTA 2005), held in Thessaloniki, Greece July 2–6, 2005. The MEDICTA conferences were established in1993, the first one taking place in Corte, Corsica and were held successively thereof on a biennial basis, moving around the Mediterranean and neighbouring countries from Cagliari (Italy, 1995), Palma de Mallorca (Spain 1997), Rio (near Patras, Greece 1999), Santiago de Compostela (Spain 2001) and Porto (Portugal 2003). The organization of this series of Conferences is greatly depending on the collaboration of the Mediterranean Thermal Analysis Societies, namely Associazone Italiana de Calorimetria e Analisi Termica (AICAT), Grupos de Calorimetria e Analise Termica do Porto (CATPOR), Grupo Especializado de Calorimetria y Analisis Termico (GECAT), Grupo Interdivisionale di Calorimetria e Analiso Termica (GICAT), Hellenic Society of Thermal Analysis (HSTA) and Israeli Group for Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry (IGTAC). Of course, local support is always in need and welcome and in the latest Conference it was provided by the Department of Chemistry of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (A.U.Th.), through its Research Committee and the Association of the Greek Chemists (A.G.C.). In common with analogous meetings, the MEDICTA conferences aim at the coverage of the most interesting if not all of the current advances in the thermal processes occurring in materials related to the widest possible spectrum of everyday life aspects as well as of the most recent advances in applications of thermal analysis. The topics covered in the 7th MEDICTA include Polymer Science and Materials, Food, Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences, Cultural Heritage, Inorganic Chemistry and Earth Sciences, Instrumentation and Miscellaneous, mainly environmental topics. Within these rather wide boundaries, scientists form different areas of research i.e. Chemistry, Physics, Geology, Pharmacy and Medicine could and have participated in both the study, elucidation, interpretation and prediction of the thermal behaviour of compounds of their interest. Not less than 162 participants were present in the Thermaic gulf last July, coming mainly from the Mediterranean and neighbouring countries. The interest in these conferences is ever-growing and this is reflected in the fact that many scientists attended from Central and Northern Europe as well as from the USA. The conference book of Abstracts contained 195 entries including 8 plenary and 7 key lectures, and 33 accepted oral and 144 poster presentations, furthermore 2 workshops devoted to Applied Thermodynamics and Geosciences (Soils, Clays and Ceramics) were organized during the conference. As the organizer of MEDICTA2005 conference and Guest Editor of this Special Issue, I would like to thank to all those who participated in the conference and especially to the authors for the careful preparation of their presentations and manuscripts. Many thanks are also due to the Editor-in-Chief of the journal JTAC, Professor Judith Simon for her kindness and valuable advices and the Assistant to Editor-in-Chief, Mrs. Klara Kiss for her helpfulness and the collection of the submitted papers. The contribution of all individuals to the success of the conference in both the scientific and social part is gratefully acknowledged. I hope that all will remember this conference with good memories. Due to the page limitation we can not include all peer reviewed and accepted papers in this Special Issue, but they will be published under the ‘OnlineFirst‘ section of the electronic Journal and later scheduled for print in Regular issues, with a footnote indicating that they were originally presented at the MEDICTA’05 conference. Prof. Maria Lalia - Kantouri

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Romanian Academy of Sciences and he is the member of the Romanian Association of Materials. He has accepted more than 40 assignments since 2009, when the EM system was introduced to our Journal. His average reviewing time is 9 days per manuscript, which is

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The year of 2010 was successful in respect of the application of the Editorial Manager System. The authors got accustomed to the submission of their manuscripts exclusively to this system and they were very thankful they could control the

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