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történeti időben [Who, when and with whom to get married? Marriage place of the individual in the way of life and historical time]. Szociológiai Szemle , 2000/2 , 105–127. 2002: Ki kivel (nem) házasodik? A partnerszelekciós minták

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Summary This paper examines, through the scope of both traditional heroic models and - mainly - Western feminist theories, the mutations of the marriage metaphor in the Grottaferrata version of Digenis Akritas, an epic of the “borderline' condition between Byzantine and Asian culture, with the former being as much differentiated by its Western (Roman-Christian) stance vis-à-vis its neighbors, as well as an Eastern empire at heart. The peculiar tendency of this epic to revel in bride-snatching and illicit, “polluting' trans-cultural liaisons (chiefly between Digenis and the Amazon Maximo) suggests the ambiguous cultural position of the Byzantine mind, the terminus of Christian Europe and the Balkan cultural conglomerate, in its inevitable zymosis with the Levant and the Orient.

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1 SOCIETY AND RITUAL: WOMEN AND MARRIAGE IN LOMBARD SOCIETY In the belief that early medieval women had no legal capacity and nor even a precise or clearly defined economic role, Italian historiography has always considered Lombard society as an

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The paper contains a full conjectural restoration of the mutilated speeches of Smikrines and Pamphile at lines 785–835 of Menander’s Epitrepontes , together with a line by line English translation and a few critical notes to supplement W. G. Arnott’s presentation of the text in the 2004 MacDowell Festschrift , which is here reproduced from the original publication.

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Ungarischen Staatsbürgerschaft. (Tübingen, 1880), 47-48; According to the Civil Code of 1811, Austrian citizenship could be acquired by way of marriage, legitimization, descent, naturalization, and entering civil service. The last case was a debated one

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The influence of Byron on Liszt was enormous, as is generally acknowledged. In particular the First Book of the Années de pèlerinage shows the poet’s influence in its choice of Byron epigraphs in English for four of the set of nine pieces. In his years of travel as a virtuoso pianist Liszt often referred to “mon byronisme.” The work by Byron that most affected Liszt is the long narrative poem Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage which was translated into many languages, including French. The word “pèlerinage” that replaced “voyageur” is a Byronic identity in Liszt’s thinking. The Byronic hero as Liszt saw him and imitated him in for example Mazeppa and Tasso is a figure who represented a positive force, suffering and perhaps a revolutionary, but definitely not a public enemy. Liszt’s life, viewed as a musical pilgrimage, led of course to Rome. Is it possible that Byron even influenced him in this direction? In this paper I try to give a portrait of the real Byron that hides behind the poseur of his literary works, and suggest that what drew Liszt to the English poet was precisely the man whom he sensed behind the artistic mask. Byron was not musical, but he was religious — as emerges from his life and his letters, a life which caused scandal to his English contemporaries. But today we can see that part of the youthful genius of the rebel Byron was his boldness in the face of hypocrisy and compromise — his heroism was simply to be true. In this we can see a parallel with the Liszt who left the piano and composed Christus. What look like incompatibilities are simply the connection between action and contemplation — between the journey and the goal. Byron, in fact, can help us follow the ligne intérieure which Liszt talked about in the 1830s.

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The present research examined the consequences of father abandonment for the reproductive strategies of girls from the Caribbean island of Curaçao. The sample consisted of 189 girls with an average age of 19.11 (SD = 2.97). Respondents were categorized in three groups, namely: ‘early father absence’ (abandoned between 0–5 years of age), ‘late father absence’ (abandoned between 6–13 years of age) and ‘father presence’ (father present during childhood). The results showed that compared to ‘late father absence’ girls and ‘father presence’ girls, ‘early father absence’ girls initiated sexual intercourse at a significant younger age. Moreover, they were less interested in getting married and in having grandchildren. These differences could not be explained by differences in educational level of the participants or occupational level of the father and the mother. There were no significant differences between the three groups in the age of menarche, the total number of sexual partners and the desire to have children. From an evolutionary life history perspective, we discuss possible explanations for, and implications of, these findings.

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The Middle Persian Deeds of Ardakhšēr Son of Pābag (Kār-nāmag i Ardakhšēr i Pābagān) contains the story of Ardakhšēr, later the founder of the Sasanian dynasty. The author of this article analysed the judicial relevant data of the epic and compared them with the Zoroastrian customs and Sasanian jurisprudence. The contradictions found led him to doubt the legitimacy of the first Sasanian king.

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Century Venice’ in Trevor Dean and Kate Lowe (eds) Marriage in Italy, 1300–1650 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 26–31. Allerston P. Marriage in

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brain Sciences 12 503 518 Szondi, L. (1937) Analysis of Marriages. An attempt at a theory of choice in

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