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.J., Collins, A.J., Stephenson, P., Gale, M.D. 1995. Application of two microsatellite sequences in wheat storage proteins as molecular markers. Theor. Appl. Genet. 90 :247–252. Gale M

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1 5 Bonnet, A., Thévenon, S., Maudet, F., Maillard, J. C. (2002) Efficiency of semi-automated fluorescent multiplex PCRs with 11 microsatellite markers for genetic studies of

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Adonina, I.G., Salina, E.A., Pestsova, E.G., Röder, M.S. 2005. Transferability of wheat microsatellites to diploid Aegilops species and determination of chromosomal localizations of microsatellites in the S

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Landjeva, S., Korzun, V., Ganeva, G. 2006. Evaluation of genetic diversity among Bulgarian winter wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) varieties during the period 1925–2003 using microsatellites. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution 53 :1605

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Balloux, F., Lugon-Moulin, N. 2002. The estimate of population differentiation with microsatellite markers. Mol. Ecol. 11 :155–165. Lugon-Moulin N

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Genetics. 1965 51 439 443 Huang, X.Q., L.X. Wang, M.X. Xu and M.S. Röder, 2003: Microsatellite

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: F. Akfirat, Y. Aydin, F. Ertugrul, S. Hasancebi, H. Budak, K. Akan, Z. Mert, N. Bolat, and A. Uncuoglu

Chague, V., Fahima, T., Dahan, A., Sun, G.L., Korol, A.B., Ronin, Y.I., Grama, A., Röder, M.S., Nevo, E. 1999. Isolation of microsatellite and RAPD markers flanking the Yr15 gene of wheat using NILs and bulked segregant analysis. Genome 42 :1050

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Akagi, H., Yokozeki, Y.A., Fujimura, T. 1996. Microsatellite DNA marker for rice chromosomes. Theor. Appl. Genet. 93 :1071–1077. Fujimura T

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Triticum monococcum represents an important source of useful genes and alleles that it would be desirable to use in wheat breeding programmes. The well-defined landmarks on the Am chromosomes could accelerate the targeted introgression of T. monococcum chromatin into the wheat genome.Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the repetitive DNA probes pSc119.2, Afa family and pTa71 showed that the pSc119.2 probe was not suitable for the identification of Am chromosomes. In contrast, the whole set of Am chromosomes (especially chromosomes 1, 4, 5 and 7) could be discriminated based on the hybridization pattern of pTa71 and Afa family. In situ hybridization with microsatellite motifs (GAA, CAG, AAC and AGG) proved that SSRs represent additional landmarks for the identification of Am chromosomes. The most promising SSR probes were the GAA and CAG motifs, which clearly discriminated the 6Am chromosome and, when used in combination with the Afa family and pTa71 probes, allowed the whole set of Am chromosomes to be reliably identified.In conclusion, fluorescence in situ hybridization using the repetitive DNA probes Afa family and pTa71, combined with SSR probes, makes it possible to identify the Am chromosomes of T. monococcum and to discriminate them from Au chromosomes in the polyploid wheat background.

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Baek, H.J., Beharav, A., Nevo, E. 2003. Ecological-genomic diversity of microsatellites in wild barley, Hordeum spontaneum populations in Jordan. Theor. Appl. Genet. 106 :397

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