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Akinoso , R. & Raji , A.O. (2011): Optimisation of oil extraction from locust bean using response surface methodology. Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol ., 113 , 245

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Present study demonstrated the isolation of most promising β-galactosidase producing bacterial strain SB from soil. Morphological, biochemical, and 16s rRNA sequence analysis identified the bacterial strain as Arthrobacter oxydans. Several chemicals, including SDS, Triton X-100, Tween 20, isoamyl alcohol, and toluene-acetone mixture, were applied for extraction of intracellular β-galactosidase from the bacterial strain Arthrobacter oxydans. Among these, Tween 20 was recorded to be most effective. Role of pH, temperature, and shaker speed on production of β-galactosidase was evaluated using Box-Behnken design of response surface methodology. According to Box-Behnken analysis, optimum production of β-galactosidase (21.38 U (mg–1 protein)) is predicted at pH 6.76, temperature 36.1 °C, and shaker speed 121.37 r.p.m. The parameters are validated with the nearest value.

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Scientometrics
Authors: Evaristo Jiménez-Contreras, Daniel Torres-Salinas, Rafael Moreno, Rosario Baños, and Emilio López-Cózar

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The possibilities of the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been explored within the ambit of Scientific Activity Analysis. The case of the system “Departments of the Area of Health Sciences of the University of Navarre (Spain)” has been studied in relation to the system “Scientific Community in the Health Sciences”, from the perspective of input/output models (factors/response). It is concluded that the RSM reveals the causal relationships between factors and responses through the construction of polynomial mathematical models. Similarly, quasiexperimental designs are proposed, these permitting scientific activity to be analysed with minimum effort and cost and high accuracy.

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systematic approach that includes multidimensional combinations of input variables using design of experiments such as Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to obtain optimal conditions with better quality assurance [ 10 ]. Design Space (DS) is a key step in the

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, while a response surface methodology based on central composite design (RSM-CCD) program was carried out for the maximum yields. In our previous work, six kinds of solvents (methanol, anhydrous, ethanol, 95% ethanol, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether

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In this study honey samples of Eucalyptus honey (Eucalyptus lanceolatus) were botanically characterized. Response surface methodology was used to analyze the effect of temperature, time and pH on the quality responses (hydroxymethylfurfural concentration and diastatic activity) of Eucalyptus honey. A central-composite rotatable design was used to develop models for the responses. At the central value of time (10 min), the maximum concentration of hydroxymethylfurfural was demonstrated at the highest temperature and pH. The maximum value of hydroxymethylfurfural concentration was also obtained at the maximum time and temperature, while keeping the pH at the central value of 5.3. Diastatic activity decreased as the pH moved away from the central pH value of 5.3 to 5.6 at any level of temperature and time. Three-dimensional response surfaces were superimposed, and the overlapping regions gave the diastatic activity (calculated as diastase number 9 to 23.09 °G) and hydroxymethylfurfural concentration (3 to 10.21 mg kg-1) at 48±1 °C for 9.5±1 min at 5.15±0.15 pH.

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Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
Authors: Szilvia Bánvölgyi, Eszter Dusza, Fiina K. Namukwambi, István Kiss, Éva Stefanovits-Bányai, and Gyula Vatai

(°C) Time (h) Solvent concentration Water (%) Alcohol (%) −1 30 1 100 0 0 45 3 50 50 1 60 5 0 100 Response surface methodology (RSM) technique was used to optimize the extraction conditions aimed at maximum recovery of polyphenol. The RSM is an

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Reaction Kinetics, Mechanisms and Catalysis
Authors: Raquel Cristóvão, Priscilla Amaral, Ana Tavares, Maria Coelho, Magali Cammarota, José Loureiro, Rui Boaventura, Eugénia Macedo, and Fernando Pessoa

Abstract  

In this work, the laccase catalyzed degradation of reactive textile dyes was studied in supercritical carbon dioxide media. A two level Box–Behnken factorial design with two factors and response surface methodology (RSM) were performed to investigate and optimize the effects of pressure and temperature on reactive red 239 (RR239), reactive yellow 15 (RY15) and reactive black 5 (RB5) dye degradations by commercial laccase in supercritical carbon dioxide media. Mathematical models were developed for each dye showing the effect of each factor and their interactions on color removal. Pressure and the interaction between temperature and pressure were the main factors affecting the decolorization. The optimum conditions for RB5 and RY15 were found to be high pressure values (>120 bar), whilst the temperature presented a minor effect on their degradation at these pressures. For RR239, both variables influenced the decolorization and the optimum conditions appear to be at low values of pressure and high values of temperature.

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Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize solid– liquid ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) conditions for the maximization of the stigmasterol content from an Ayurvedic plant Tecomella undulata (T. undulata) bark. The Box—Behnken design (BBD), form of RSM, was employed for the optimization of ultrasonic extraction parameters, viz., temperature (°C), drug-to-solvent ratio (mg/10 mL), and time (min). Quantification of stigmasterol was performed using high-performance thin-layer chromatography in visible range (HPTLC–vis). HPTLC analysis of stigmasterol was carried out in the absorbance mode at 510 nm using toluene—ethyl acetate—formic acid (8.0:1.5:0.5, v/v) as the solvent system. This system was found to give compact spots for stigmasterol at R f 0.44 ± 0.01. The optimal UAE processing parameters were the following: extraction time, 46 min; temperature, 50°C; and drug-to-solvent ratio, 528 mg/10 mL, with stigmasterol yield of 2.45 ± 0.073%. This study proves that the use of BBD for the optimization of UAE process provides more accuracy than single factorial optimization. The optimized UAE was a more efficient technique over conventional Soxhlet extraction (CSE) due to the higher stigmasterol content along with the low ingredient and time consumption. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no studies have been published previously addressing specifically the optimization of ultrasonic extraction of stigmasterol from T. undulata bark using BBD.

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addition to the experimental investigation, new statistical methods were applied to determine the optimum parameters, i.e., to reduce the number of the experiments [ 21–23 ]. In this approach, Paventhan et al. [ 21 ] used Response Surface Methodology (RSM

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