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Community Ecology
Authors: G. Bacaro, D. Rocchini, C. Duprè, M. Diekmann, F. Carnesecchi, V. Gori, and A. Chiarucci

. 2007 8 41 46 Bacaro, G., C. Ricotta and S. Mazzoleni. 2007. Measuring beta-diversity from taxonomic similarity. J. Veg

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. 1996 . On Similarity . Target Vol. 8 . No. 1 . 159 – 164 . Christensen , T. P. & Schjoldager , A. 2016 . Mapping the Uptake and Use of Computer-aided Translation

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is that it is flexible for special situations. Therefore, we searched for other methods that can be used for measuring the “goodness” of banks to rank them. Our second method, the Similarity Analysis is one of the proper methodologies for ranking

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processes: the role of similarity in GIS applications for landscape analysis . In: M. Fisher , H. Scholten and D. Unwin (eds), Spatial Analytical Perspectives on GIS. Taylor and Francis , London . pp. 175 – 185

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Abstract  

Journals covered by the 2006 Science Citation Index Journal Citation Reports database have been subjected to a clustering procedure utilizing h-similarity as the underlying similarity measure. Clustering complemented with a prototyping routine provided well-conceivable results that are both compatible with and further refine existing taxonomies of science.

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Abstract  

Hirsch’s concept of h-index was used to define a similarity measure for journals. The h-similarity is easy to calculate from the publicly available data of the Journal Citation Reports, and allows for plausible interpretation. On the basis of h-similarity, a relative eminence indicator of journals was determined: the ratio of the JCR impact factor to the weighted average of that of similar journals. This standardization allows journals from disciplines with lower average citation level (mathematics, engineering, etc.) to get into the top lists.

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Learning & Perception
Authors: Alexandra Bendixen, Tamás M. Bőhm, Orsolya Szalárdy, Robert Mill, Susan L. Denham, and István Winkler

Sound sources often emit trains of discrete sounds, such as a series of footsteps. Previously, two different principles have been suggested for how the human auditory system binds discrete sounds together into perceptual units. The feature similarity principle is based on linking sounds with similar characteristics over time. The predictability principle is based on linking sounds that follow each other in a predictable manner. The present study compared the effects of these two principles. Participants were presented with tone sequences and instructed to continuously indicate whether they perceived a single coherent sequence or two concurrent streams of sound. We investigated the influence of separate manipulations of similarity and predictability on these perceptual reports. Both grouping principles affected perception of the tone sequences, albeit with different characteristics. In particular, results suggest that whereas predictability is only analyzed for the currently perceived sound organization, feature similarity is also analyzed for alternative groupings of sound. Moreover, changing similarity or predictability within an ongoing sound sequence led to markedly different dynamic effects. Taken together, these results provide evidence for different roles of similarity and predictability in auditory scene analysis, suggesting that forming auditory stream representations and competition between alternatives rely on partly different processes.

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Abstract  

It is shown that activation analysis is especially suited to serve as a basis for determining the chemical similarity between samples defined by their trace element concentration patterns. The general problem of classification and identification is discussed. The nature of possible classification structures and their approriate clustering strategies is considered. A practical computer method is suggested and its application as well as the graphical representation of classification results are given. The possibility for classification using information theory is mentioned. Classification of chemical elements is discussed and practically realized after Hadamard transformation of the concerntration variation patterns in a series of samples.

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Bužarovska, Eleni. 2005. Equality versus similarity constructions in English. Journal of Language and Linguistics 4. 74–99. Bužarovska E. Equality versus similarity constructions in English

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waters are classified according to similarities in physico-chemical patterns. Inter-group and intra-group differences are quantified. Based on these measurements, answers to the following questions are sought. Is it true that more monitoring efforts are

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