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Abstract  

Investigating the relationships found in the documentation of a subject field is one method of examining the communication taking place in that field. Bibliometrics provides an objective method for this type of investigation. Coauthorship, while intuitively seeming to indicate strong communication links, nevertheless has been shown to produce graphical structures that vary with changes in threshold. Having determined that clustering structure does exist in the data, preferred partitions are identified as those least likely to have occurred by chance. Further analysis is made to test that the preferred or meaningful structures produced from the coauthor relationship do indeed correspond with empirical evidence of meaning. A small dataset of 371 authors and 550 coauthor pairs is used to investigate correspondence between experimental structures and empirical evidence. Results show that components of the experimental structures are largely consistent with subject content groups as determined by index terms. Geographic focus accounts for about half the cases showing term overlap. Hence, we have some evidence that bibliometric structures determined from the coauthor relationship may be consistent with networks of communication. If this continues to be documented by further research, bibliometric analysis of coauthor relationships found in the scholarly communication of a subject area can become a basic tool for communication research.

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Bibliometric analysis - A new business area for information professionals in libraries?

Support for scientific research by perception and trend analysis

Scientometrics
Authors: Rafael Ball and Dirk Tunger

Summary  

Supplying library users with literature by a seamless linking of media is the goal of (scientific) libraries. By the digitization of primary and secondary data and the convergence of products and providers, libraries have already come very close to achieving this ideal. A digital library is the realization of this goal. However, many librarians are in danger of running out of imagination. What will come after the digital library? Will information professionals still be needed? What services can libraries offer? Bibliometric analysis is an example of new business areas in libraries. This paper will discuss what shape this service could take in practice, who needs it and what target groups exist in the scientific environment. Concrete examples of bibliometric analysis from the Central Library of Research Centre Jlich will round off the overview.

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Abstract  

Patents are a useful source of scientific and technological information. The bibliometrics analysis of patents has been made to identify technological trends in the area of fullerenes and study other parameters like growth of the patenting activity, active players in the field from industry, academia and government research institutions. It indicates that firms and R&D organisations in developing countries could undertake similar study on specific topics of their interests and obtain relevant insights.

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Abstract  

The objective of this study is to conduct a bibliometric analysis of all biological invasions-related publications in the Science Citation Index (SCI) from 1991 to 2007. The indicator citation per publication (CPP) was used to evaluate the impact of articles, journals, and institutions. In the 3323 articles published in 521 journals, 7261 authors from 1905 institutions of 100 countries participated. As the most productive country of biological invasions research, the US will benefit from more collaboration between institutions, countries, and continents. In addition, analysis of keywords was applied to reveal research trends.

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bibliometric analysis only at an aggregate level. As described in our earlier studies we use a large data set covering all university chemistry groups in the Netherlands, covering in the 10-year period 1991–2000 in total 157 research groups, about 700

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bibliometric analysis to 159 LIS professors’ 2,401 peer-reviewed publications published between 2001 and 2010. Bibliometric analysis of publication data found an increasing trend for collaboration (52.75% of total publications with single authors and 47

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Abstract  

A bibliometric analysis was performed to assess the quantitative trend of published pentachlorophenol (PCP) remediation studies, including both degradation and sorption. The documents studies were retrieved from the Science Citation Index (SCI) for the period from 1994 to 2005. The trends were analyzed with the retrieved results in publication language, document type, page count, publication output, publication pattern, authorship, citation analysis and country of publication. The results indicated that degradation was the emphasis for PCP remediation. The average impact factor of the journals was higher for publishing degradation studies in comparison to that publishing sorption studies. And there was a positive correlation between CPP and IF for journals published more than two papers. The publishing countries of both degradation and sorption denoted that most of these researches were done by USA and Canada. Two to four authors was the most popular level of co-authorship.

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Scientometrics
Authors: C. Macias-Chapula, Irma Rodea-Castro, and Nora Narvaez-Berthelemot

Abstract  

This work reports on the preliminary results of a bibliometric analysis of AIDS literature, as produced in or about Latin America and the Caribbean for the period 1980–1996. Two international and two regional secondary sources were used in order to obtain comparative analyses regarding for example, comprehensiveness of AIDS literature coverage and local/main frame visibility. Less than 1000 records were retrieved from each of the databases searched. Leading countries in AIDSLINE were Haiti, Brasil, Mexico and Puerto Rico. The distribution by year of publication showed a decrease in Haiti records, from 54 in 1983, to 4 in 1995. The rest of the countries either increased or maintained an average production throughout the years. Regional secondary information sources were less current and comprehensive in the field. Further lines of research are described by the authors.

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Summary  

Large scale bibliometric analysis is often hindered by the presence of homonyms, or namesakes, of the researchers of interest in literature databases. This makes it difficult to build up a true picture of a researcher's publication record, as publications by another researcher with the same name will be included in search results. Using additional information such as title and author addresses, an expert in the field can generally tell if a paper is by a researcher or a namesake; however, manual checking is not practical in large scale studies. Previously various methods have been used to address this problem, chiefly based on filtering by subject, funding acknowledgement or author address. Co-author inclusion is a novel algorithmic method based on co-authorship for dealing with problems of homonyms in large bibliometric surveys. We compared co-author inclusion and subject and funding based filter against the manual assignment of papers by a subject expert (which we assumed to be correct). The subject and funding based filtering identifies only 75% as many papers as assigned by manual scoring. By using co-author inclusion once we increase this to 95%, two further rounds produces 99% as many papers as manual filtering. Although the number of papers identified that were not assigned to the PIs manually also increases, the absolute number is low: rising from 0.2% papers with subject and funding filtering, to 3% papers for three rounds of co-author inclusion.

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Bibliometric analysis of publications of Spanish pharmacologists in the SCI (1984–89)

I. Contribution to the “Pharmacology & Pharmacy” subfield (ISI)

Scientometrics
Authors: M. Bordons, F. García-Jover, and S. Barrigon

Abstract  

The present study is a bibliometric analysis, of publications of Spanish pharmacologists, referenced in the journals of the Pharmacology & Pharmacy subfield of the Science Citation Index- CD Edition from 1984 to 1989. During this time the scientific output of Spanish pharmacologists has been growing at an impressive rate being almost doubled. This rate being notably greater than that corresponding to publications of Spain in all science fields. This increase in scientific output was accompanied by a time-dependent decrease on year by year step basis in the expected impact factor (EIF) of publications (Articles plus Notes), from 1.71 in 1984 to 1.28 in 1989, in close correlation with an increase of mean number of authors per paper, from 3.67 to 4.16 authors/paper, respectively. Moreover, the larger the number of authors/paper, the smaller the EIF. Only 8 journals cumulated more than 50% of the papers. The scientific production was geographically localized at a high extent (Barcelona, Madrid, Valencia accounted for the 63.7% of all the papers) in governmental institutions (University, 75.2%, Hospitals, 14.1%; CSIC, 10.5%) with one large geographical area lacking any productivity.

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