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The paper discusses the strategies and the rhetorical elements of the Norwegian Inner Mission during a period of political and cultural conflict  the 1920’s and 1930’s.Special attentions paid to understanding the ambivalence between premodern values and modern strategies as they were expressed by one of the leaders of one of the inner mission organisations, professor of theology Ole Hallesby (1879 –1961).In his th nking, the explicit aim of the nner mission activities was the rechristianization of Norway, the means were actions organised according to the modern soc ety, but the cultural and soc al ideal was the non-secularzed, premodern Norway – as opposed to urban pluralism. Probably, this ambivalence made the inner mission strategy a political failure.

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Abstract

In this paper, a single-phase to three-phase converter is proposed to provide variable output voltage and frequency. The proposed topology employs only six IGBT switches, which form the front-end rectifier and the output inverter for the one step conversion from single-phase supply to output three-phase supply. The front-end rectifier permits bidirectional power flow and provides excellent regulation against fluctuations in source voltage. Moreover, it incorporates active input current shaping feature. An easy method to implement control strategy is proposed. This control strategy ensures nearly unity input power factor with sinusoidal input current over the operating range. Based on sensorless vector control technique, the proposed converter is used for the speed control of the three-phase induction motor. A low cost motor drive can be achieved using the proposed converter and control technique. Simulation and experimental results are carried out to analyse and explore the characteristics of the low cost drive system.

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Eustathios, the illustrious scholar and clergyman of the 12th century AD, wrote a commentary to Pindar’s epinician odes, from which only the proem survives. Eustathios treatment of the lyric poet, his ideas and criteria of literary criticism have not been re-assessed since Kambylis’ interpretation and text edition (1991). The aim of this paper is to supply this re-evaluation. Besides, a new Homeric allusion and some evidence for Eustathios’ productive imitation of Pindar’s style are dealt with.

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All three descriptions of dawn in Statius’ Achilleid (1. 242–5; 1. 819–20; 2. 1–4) are tightly connected to the “metamorphoses” of Achilles in the poem. These passages also recall the dawn opening Iliad 19, and the Homeric system of metaphors and symbols comparing the hero’s return to battle to the arrival of light and dawn. A particularly complex connection between Achilles’ exposure and the sunrise is established in the third Statian passage under discussion, which can also be interpreted as a possible prediction of Achilles’ future as an epic and elegiac hero. The genitor coruscae lucis mentioned in this passage can be identified as Iuppiter/Diespiter; as a consequence, the description sheds some light on the god’s role in the Achilleid as well.

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Philology is the servant of classical antiquity. And translation serves it by transposing it into another language. First translated into Latin (when originally written in Greek), later translated from Greek or Latin into the vernaculars, the works of the classical authors have reached modernity through the complex filter of philological interpretation and literary apprehension. P. Hummel analyzes the ways in which objectivity and subjectivity interact in the restitution of what is supposed to be the original and genuine meaning of the texts translated.

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The paper deals with some parts of the first, seventh, eighth and ninth book of the Pharsalia that focus either on Pompey or Caesar. The aim of the analysis of these passages is to show that Lucan alluded to Latin as well as Greek poets in order to place the characters of his heroes in a wider literary and mythical context.

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This paper attempts to solve a difficult textual problem in Pindar (N. 5. 43). Although the manuscripts concerning this verse are unanimous, editors tend to correct the passage. I, on the other hand, argue in favour of preserving the tradition in the sense: immo nuper delectat Neptunum ad gentem Pelei cognatam etiam nunc transgressum materterus tuus, Pythea. Implications of the suggested new interpretation are presented.

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