Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 518 items for :

  • "manuscripts" x
  • Arts and Humanities x
  • All content x
Clear All

Abstract

This paper presents a critical edition of Mordecai Qazaz's poem Adam oglu 'Man's son' written in Crimean Karaim probably at the end of the 18th century. It was published in 1841 under another title by Jacob Firkovich who did not provide the name of its author. This publication has not yet been examined. It is only now that we can identify it with Adam oglu. In the present edition, the text is edited on the basis of four manuscripts and the printed edition. Attempt was made to established the basic form of the poem and discuss language features.

Restricted access

The Hungarian (Székely) Gábor Bálint of Szentkatolna (1844–1913) was one of the first researchers of Kalmyk and Khalkha vernacular language, folklore and ethnography. His valuable records are written in a very accurate transcription and include the specimens of Kalmyk and Khalkha spoken languages, folklore material and ethnographic narratives, and a comparative grammar of western and eastern Mongolian languages. Bálint’s manuscripts had not been released until recent years when Ágnes Birtalan published his Comparative Grammar in 2009 and the Kalmyk corpus with a comprehensive analysis in 2011.

The present article aims to give an introduction to Bálint’s ethnographic materials recorded among the Kalmyks (1871–1872) and Khalkhas (1873). Despite the similar economic and cultural milieu the two ethnic groups lived in, there is considerable difference between the Kalmyk and Khalkha text corpora. Besides presenting and systematising Bálint’s ethnographic material, I shall try to clarify the reason why this significant divergence emerges between the two text corpora. Specimens of a particular phase of the wedding ceremony are represented as examples from both text corpora.

Restricted access

In his edition of Pro Milone A. C. Clark has misreported numerous readings of two Floren­tine manuscripts: Laur. XXIII Sin. 3 and BN J.IV. 4. This paper presents a list of mistakes and the rele­vant true readings of the MSS.

Restricted access

This paper contains a critical edition of an unpublished Sanskrit play preserved in an incomplete Nepalese manuscript dated to 1382. In the introduction an attempt is made to determine when and where the play might have been written, and on what possible sources the plot is based.

Restricted access

A Viennese manuscript of the first act of Mozart's Die Zauberflöte recently surfaced in Budapest. The title page indicates that it was sold by the actor, singer and theatre copyist, Kaspar Weiß in 1796, and bears the name “Theater auf der Wieden” in Weiß's handwriting. This is the only known score with a clear connection to the theatre for which Mozart composed his singspiel. It was probably based on the theatre's score, which was certainly copied from Mozart's autograph. Upon close investigation the Budapest manuscript reveals a number of deviations from the autograph, variants that suggest something of a performing tradition that may in fact date back to Mozart himself, who conducted the first performances. At least one other Viennese copy of Die Zauberflöte exhibits similar peculiarities, indicating a path of transmission that complements the one going back to Constanze Mozart, who sold copies based on the autograph.

Restricted access

The fifteenth-century manuscript Suppl. Gr. 45 (Austrian National Library, ÖNB, Vienna) contains an extensive Greek-Latin dictionary, where one can find a great number of marginal notes written by different hands and in different languages (Greek, Latin and Italian). Approximately sixty of these glossary notes are quotations from the well-known Byzantine code of law, the Basilika (9th century), which was initiated by Emperor Basil I and completed under the reign of his successor, Leo VI the Wise. In my paper, I intend to examine these marginal notes and argue that their direct source text is not the monumental code of law, the Basilika itself, but rather its abridged version from the 10th cent., the Synopsis Maior Basilicorum.

Restricted access

Basis of a Bilingual Manuscript of the Pentateuch. Massorot 12, pp. 97–101 (in Hebrew). Livne-Kafri O. A Note on Coptic and Judaeo-Arabic on the Basis of a Bilingual Manuscript of

Restricted access

Bilingual Manuscript of the Pentateuch. Massorot 12, pp. 97–101 (in Hebrew). Livne-Kafri O. A Note on Coptic and Judaeo-Arabic on the Basis of a Bilingual Manuscript of the Pentateuch

Restricted access

Peerenboom, R. P. (1993): Law and Morality in Ancient China-The Silk Manuscripts of Huang-Lao. Albany, State University of New York Press. Law and Morality in Ancient China-The Silk Manuscripts of Huang

Restricted access

. Fujieda Akira (2005) (ed.): Torufan shutsudo Butten no kenkyū: Kōshō zan’ei shakuroku トルファン出土仏典の研究-高昌殘影釈錄 (A study of Buddhist manuscripts discovered in Turfan). Kyoto. Funayama Toru 船山徹 (2006): Masquerading as Translation

Restricted access