Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 2,051 items for :

  • "population" x
  • Medical and Health Sciences x
  • All content x
Clear All

. Genetics 193 1123 1148 Alföldi, L.: Studies on bacterial conjugational crosses via model populations. I. The

Restricted access
Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Petra Anna Golovics, Péter László Lakatos, Gyula Dávid, Tünde Pandur, Zsuzsanna Erdélyi, Ágnes Horváth, Gábor Mester, Mihály Balogh, István Szipocs, Csaba Molnár, Erzsébet Komáromi, Barbara Dorottya Lovász, Miklós Szathmári, Lajos S. Kiss, and László Lakatos

clinical characteristics, course, and prognosis of inflammatory bowel disease during the last 5 decades: a population-based study from Copenhagen, Denmark. Inflamm. Bowel Dis., 2007, 13 , 481–489. Vind I

Open access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: László Fésüs, Attila Zsolnai, István Anton, and László Sáfár

Áldásy, P. and Süveges, T. (1964): Incidence of scrapie in the domestic sheep population (in Hungarian, with English abstract). Magyar Állatorvosok Lapja 19 , 463

Restricted access

Animals A total of 18 male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats of 8 weeks old weighing 100 g each were used for this study. They were housed in plastic cages at a population of six rats per cage at a room (daylight) temperature of about 29–32 °C. All

Restricted access

While the effects of instantaneous, single-bout exposure to hypoxia have been well researched, little is known about the autonomic response during, or as an adaptation to, repeated intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE) in a sedentary population. Resting heart rate variability (HRV) and exercise capacity was assessed in 16 participants (8 receiving IHE, [Hyp] and 8 receiving a placebo treatment [C]) before and after a 4-week IHE intervention. Heart rate variability was also measured during an IHE session in the last week of the intervention. Post-intervention, the root mean squared successive difference (rMSSD) increased substantially in Hyp (71.6 ± 52.5%, mean change ± 90% confidence limits) compared to C suggesting an increase in vagal outflow. However, aside from a likely decrease in submaximal exercise heart rate in the Hyp group (–5.0 ± 6.4%) there was little evidence of improved exercise capacity. During the week 4 IHE measurement, HRV decreased during the hypoxic exposure (reduced R-R interval: –7.5 ± 3.2%; and rMSSD: –24.7 ± 17.3%) suggesting a decrease in the relative contribution of vagal activity. In summary, while 4 weeks of IHE is unlikely to improve maximal exercise capacity, it may be a useful means of increasing HRV in people unable to exercise.

Restricted access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Jelena Blagojević, Milanko Šekler, Marija Rajičić, Branka Pejić, Ivana Budinski, Vladimir M. Jovanović, Tanja Adnađević, Dejan Vidanović, Kazimir Matović, and Mladen Vujošević

The greatest epidemiological significance of leptospirosis in Europe comes from the fact that it is the most widespread zoonosis in the world. However, epizootiological data, especially information on maintenance hosts such as small wild mammals, are largely missing. To fill this gap in data in Serbia, we used RT-PCR for the detection of pathogenic Leptospira species and analysed 107 animals belonging to six species of small wild mammals (Apodemus agrarius, Apodemus flavicollis, Microtus arvalis, Myodes glareolus, Microtus subterraneus and Sorex araneus) collected from two localities. The animals from the first locality that was situated in a tourist area, were collected for four consecutive years (2014–2017). We found persistent incidence of infection from year to year ranging from 6.67% to 78.57%. The average frequency of infected animals was 33.3% with the highest frequency in 2014, the year characterised by a very high number of flooding days. All animals proved to be infected with pathogenic Leptospira species that were collected from the second locality situated in an agricultural area in a single year, 2014. The findings show a variable but constant presence of pathogenic Leptospira species in populations of small wild mammals in the studied areas, which indicates the need for constant monitoring.

Restricted access
Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Tran Duc Anh Ly, Linda Hadjadj, Van Thuan Hoang, Ndiaw Goumbala, Thi Loi Dao, Sekene Badiaga, Herve Tissot-Dupont, Philippe Brouqui, Didier Raoult, Jean-Marc Rolain, and Philippe Gautret

Introduction Little information is available about gastrointestinal bacterial infections in homeless populations. During 2015–2016 a multistate outbreak of Shigella occurred among homeless persons in Oregon, USA. There, the homeless accounted for

Restricted access

Sleep deprivation affects the homeostasis of the physiological functions in the human organism. Beer is the only beverage that contains hops, a plant which has a sedative effect. Our objective is to determine the improvement of subjective sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The sample was conducted among a population of 30 university students. The study took place during a period of 3 weeks, the first 7 days were used for the Control, and during the following 14 days the students ingested beer (were asked to drink non-alcoholic beer) while having dinner. The results revealed that Subjective Sleep Quality improved in the case of those students who drank one beer during dinner compared to the Control, this is corroborated by the fact that Sleep Latency decreased (p < 0.05) compared to their Control. The overall rating Global Score of Quality of Sleep also improved significantly (p < 0.05). These results confirm that the consumption of non-alcoholic beer at dinner time helps to improve the quality of sleep at night.

Restricted access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Andrea Bistyák, S. Kecskeméti, R. Glávits, I. Tischler, S. Nagy, G. Kardos, and I. Kiss

An epizootic of Pacheco’s disease is reported from a zoo bird population. The infection was introduced by wild-captured Patagonian conures ( Cyanoliseus patagonus ) despite 61 days of quarantine. The disease affected several parrot species and, interestingly, three out of seven bearded barbets ( Lybius dubius ). The mortality rate was 30.93%. Autopsy revealed abdominal hyperaemia with liver haemorrhages and, in less rapid cases, yellowish discoloration and fragility of the liver. Death was caused by the collapse of circulation. Histopathology demonstrated liver cell necrosis, disintegration of the lobular structure, and a few intranuclear inclusion bodies. Icosahedral virions were detected by electron microscopy. The virus was isolated in the allantoic cavity of embryonated chicken eggs as well as in chicken embryo fibroblast cell culture. A 281-bp-long fragment of psittacid herpesvirus DNA was detected by PCR in cell culture material and liver samples of the affected birds. To our knowledge this is the first report of Pacheco’s disease in bearded barbets as well as the first occurrence of Pacheco’s disease in Hungary.

Restricted access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Boglárka Vincze, Márta Varga, Orsolya Kutasi, Petra Zenke, Ottó Szenci, Ferenc Baska, Alan Bartels, Sándor Spisák, Sándor Cseh, and Norbert Solymosi

majority of infected animals were of different origin. The aims of the present study were (a) to perform a pedigree analysis on a study population affected by EGS, (b) to detect signs of heritability of EGS and (c) to show the possibility of genetic

Open access