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Introduction Fortification of staple food, such as rice, can be an excellent tool to improve the nutrition and health especially in low- and middle-income countries, where micronutrient deficiency burden is an extensive problem [ 1 ]. Rice is the

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Crawford, R. D. (1964): The relationship between sowing date, latitude, yield and duration for rice ( Oryza sativa L.). Tropical Agriculture Trinidad , 41 , 214-224. The relationship between sowing date, latitude, yield and

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Howeler, R.H., Cadavid, L.F. 1976. Screening of rice cultivars for tolerance to Al-toxicity in nutrient solution as compared with a field screening method. Agron. J. 68 :551–555. Cadavid L

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Cumagun, C.J.R., Hockenhull, J., Lübeck, M. 2000. Characterization of Trichoderma isolates from Philippine rice fields by UP-PCR and rDNA-ITS1 analysis: Identification of UP-PCR markers. J. Phytopathol. 148 :109

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. 1 47 108 Yoshida, S. 1981: Fundamentals of Rice Crop Science. IRRI, Los Banos, Manila, Philippines, 115 p. Alberda, T

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: J. Amorim, S. Eliziário, D. Gouveia, A. Simőes, J. Santos, M. Conceiçăo, A. Souza, and M. Trindade

Abstract  

The thermogravimetry (TG) is a technique used in the quality control of foods. In this work the moisture and ash contents in the rice and by-products (bran and husk), the thermal stability and the gelatinization process by conventional, thermogravimetric and calorimetric methods were studied. The moisture and ash contents obtained by TG and conventional methods did not present significant differences. The rice presented higher starch content, while the bran presented higher protein content. The thermogravimetric data presented the following thermal stability order: rice>bran>husk. The calorimetric curves indicated the gelatinization of the starch. The kinetic parameters were compatible.

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Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 50 605 608 IRRI 1989: Toward 2000 and Beyond. International Rice Research

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12 8711 8721 Cheng, X., Sardana, R., Kaplan, H., Altosaar, I. 1998. Agrobacterium -transformed rice plants expressing synthetic crylA

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: L.R. Vemireddy, N. Ranjithkumar, A. Vipparla, M. Surapaneni, G. Choudhary, K.V. Sudhakarrao, and E.A. Siddiq

India bred high yielding rice varieties have enriched to a great extent the global rice germplasm since the mid-sixties. Systematic research efforts for development of cultivar-specific DNA fingerprints of major Indian rice cultivars, however, have not received due attention. The present investigation was aimed at development of DNA fingerprints for 90 high yielding rice varieties using hypervariable microsatellite (hvRM) markers. A panel of eight markers, viz. RM11313, RM13584, RM15004, RM5844, RM22250, RM22565, RM24260 and RM8207 was chosen from 52 polymorphic markers based on their highly polymorphic nature, SSR repeat type and number and ability to distinguish genotypes, in order to develop DNA fingerprints of 90 varieties. The remaining high polymorphic hvRM markers could be of immense value in future to distinguish new cultivars, in case they could not be distinguished by the 8 marker panel. Four of the 8 markers, viz. RM22250, RM13584, RM24260 and RM5844 were located in expressed genes and could be of value in DUS (Distinctness, Uniformity and Stability) testing. Thus we suggested, that this set of 8 loci could be used as standard for DNA fingerprinting of Indian rice cultivars.

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Availability of markers that distinguish commercially important premium Basmati rice varieties from cheaper Basmati or non-Basmati indica rice varieties is of interest to exporters, commercial suppliers and consumers to ensure the varietal purity of Basmati rice supplies. In this study, a fingerprint database of 27 rice varieties including commercially important traditional Basmati (TB), cross-bred (evolved) Basmati and some non-Basmati indica rice varieties has been prepared using 50 microsatellite markers. A total of 271 electromorphs (alleles) were detected at 50 SSR (simple sequence repeat) loci, 92 of which were observed only in 2–10 of the 16 Basmati rice varieties. Notably, 7–10 of the sixteen Basmati rice varieties had the same Basmati specific electromorphs at RM562, RM551 and RM547 loci. Alarge number of unique (22) and null (16) electromorphs were noticed in Basmati rice varieties. A combination of four SSR markers (RM224, RM248, RM547 and RM594) can be used to differentiate all the 27 rice varieties. Specific SSR markers have been identified for the authentication of Premium Basmati rice cultivars such as Taraori Basmati (RM547, RM594 and RM511), Basmati 370 (RM252, RM426 and RM527), Karnal Local (RM248, RM423 and RM488) and Pusa 1121 (RM252, RM400 and RM410), and for the detection of adulterant like Sharbati (RM215, RM423 and RM259). SSR database reported here, shall broaden the list of SSR markers already recommended for varietal identification and detection of adulteration in Basmati rice supplies.

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