Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 130 items for :

  • "rice ( Oryza sativa L.)" x
  • All content x
Clear All

A field experiment was conducted at Tamil Nadu Agricultural University from July 2001 to July 2002 to study the effect of different stubble management practices using biological inoculants on the growth and yield of rice in rice-based cropping systems. inoculation with Trichoderma viride during stubble incorporation followed by the application of 120 kg N ha-1 in 4 splits produced significantly taller plants, higher LAI and dry matter, a larger number of productive tillers, longer panicles with more filled grains and higher grain yield. However, it was on par with the stubble management practice involving Trichoderma viride followed by the application of 90 kg N ha-1 in 4 splits.

Restricted access

Brown planthopper (BPH) is one of the destructive insect pests causing significant yield losses in rice. BPH causes direct damage to the rice plants by sucking the sap from phloem, causing hopper burn and transmitting viral diseases like grassy and ragged stunt viruses. Several resistant donors have been identified from time to time, but the new biotypes of the pest arise to defeat the extended use of resistance genes in a single variety. This necessitates the regular identification of new resistant donors along with their nature of inheritance and gene action controlling the resistance. Knowing the inheritance pattern, gene action and number of genes controlling a trait helps the plant breeders to plan the effective breeding approaches for crop improvement. The present investigation was hence carried out to know the inheritance pattern, gene action and number of genes controlling BPH resistance in newly identified sources. The results indicated that the BPH resistance in PHS 29 genotype is under the control of single recessive gene. Whereas, it is controlled by two recessive genes in MRST 3 genotype. This reveals that relatively higher population size will be required to recover desirable segregants in the segregating populations involving MRST 3 genotype as one of the parents as compared to that involving PHS 29 genotype as parent. Since, the resistance in both the cases being recessive in nature, the trait will hence show significant additive effect, indicating that pure line development will be desirable for improvement of such a trait.

Restricted access

This study was to determine the gene expression pattern and phenotypic change of Cheongcheong, Nagdong, TN1, and 8 different pedigrees of the CNDH population when WBPH infestation initiated at the reproductive stage of the crop. WBPH infested plants generally showed higher expression level of defense genes compared with the uninfected plants. LOX transcriptional levels in Nagdong and CNDH42-1 did not increase after WBPH feeding at all-time course. Chlorophyll content declined in infested plants compared to their controls, but still CNDH3, CNDH14-2, and CNDH65 were healthier. Heavy and extensive WBPH feeding affected rice yield and grain quality although the infestation started at the reproductive stage.

Restricted access
Cereal Research Communications
Authors: X. Zhang, Y. Chen, Y. Wei, W. Lu, H. Liao, Y. Liu, X. Yang, X. Li, L. Yang, L. Li, and R. Li

mapping of 2240 new SSR markers for rice ( Oryza sativa L.). DNA Research 9 :199–207. Stein L. Development and mapping of 2240 new SSR markers for rice (Oryza sativa L

Restricted access

Crawford, R. D. (1964): The relationship between sowing date, latitude, yield and duration for rice ( Oryza sativa L.). Tropical Agriculture Trinidad , 41 , 214-224. The relationship between sowing date, latitude, yield and

Restricted access

An allometric analysis of biomass and N mass allocation of rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings under non-shaded (100% of full sunlight) and shaded (30% of full sunlight) treatments were conducted. The allometric slopes and the intercepts were estimated using standardized major axis regression. Results indicated that biomass was preferentially allocated to stems during plant ontogeny, and leaves and roots were isometric when rice seedlings were not shaded. Under shade, however, more biomass was allocated to leaves and stems. N mass allocation was also altered by shading in that more N mass was allocated to the aerial shoots, and plants accumulated less N mass when shaded. Our study revealed that both biomass and N mass were in accordance with the optimal partitioning theory.

Restricted access

In Hungary rice ( Oryza sativa L.) is cultivated under flooded conditions. Direct seeding into the soil is applied usually. The optimal sowing date is a key factor necessary to the success of this annual crop because of the relatively short growing season. The main objective of this research was to: (1) analyse duration of period from sowing to emergence at different temperature values, (2) determine base temperature of this phenophase and (3) establish a thermal time model for rice emergence. To do this, growth chamber experiments with 5 Hungarian cultivars were conducted to determine the time to median emergence (E 50 ) at constant temperature of 14 to 34 °C in 2 °C steps. The sowing depth was 2 cm, and moisture was not a limiting factor. It was found that the critical thermal zone, which is of highest practical importance, is between 14 and 16 °C. At these values the E 50 is 23.9 and 13.4 days, respectively, showing a border between unfavourable and acceptable conditions. In the temperature interval between 26 and 34 °C the time needed for emergence was only 3.3 to 4.4 days. Variety differences were also detected. Base temperature was found between 9.8 and 10.9 °C. The thermal time requirements of 4 cultivars varied between 69 and 73 °C day. Data of field experiment with 9 sowing dates and a pot experiment with 3 sowings confirmed that our thermal time model can successfully simulate the emergence of rice.

Restricted access

Field trials were conducted in the dry (Experiment I) and wet (Experiment II) seasons of 1997 at Samaru (11°11' N, 7°38' E, 686 m above sea level) in the northern Guinea Savanna ecological zone of Nigeria to study the effects of nitrogen rates on the reaction of upland rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties to Striga hermonthica (Del.) Benth. The results indicate that FARO 48, a variety normally susceptible to Striga hermonthica, exhibited resistance. FARO 11 exhibited tolerance, while FARO 38, FARO 46 and FARO 45 exhibited susceptibility. The application of 90 and 120 kg N/ha delayed and reduced Striga emergence on the crop, induced a low crop reaction score and produced grain yields that were the maximum or significantly higher than the least. No significant differences in Striga infestation were observed between nitrogen rates of 30-120 kg N/ha. The significant interaction between upland rice varieties and nitrogen rates indicates that the susceptible varieties require higher rates of nitrogen to ameliorate the effect of Striga compared with the resistant varieties.

Restricted access

The introduction of new crop varieties is important to improve farm productivity and increase food security in developing countries. This study was conducted to determine the performance of improved varieties of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), rice (Oryza sativa L.), mungbean [(Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] and potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in comparison to local varieties through farmers’ participatory evaluation. The study was conducted during three years (2006 to 2008) with 948 farmers’ participatory field trials across 18 districts in three Eastern provinces (Nangarhar, Laghman and Kunar) of Afghanistan. One or more improved varieties of wheat, rice, mungbean and potato were compared to the most popular local variety. Data were recorded on the grain yield of wheat, rice and mungbean, and the tuber yield of potato. On average, the improved varieties outyielded local varieties by 69, 57, 70 and 65% for wheat, rice, mungbean, and potato, respectively. Economic analysis in terms of net benefit demonstrated that the adoption of improved varieties resulted in additional incomes of US$ 1840, 1299, 574 and 790 ha-1 for wheat, rice, mungbean and potato, respectively. These findings underline the importance of on-farm farmers’ participatory technology evaluation in developing countries to disseminate new crop varieties to improve farm productivity.

Restricted access

The current study was carried out in both pot and field conditions to investigate the effects of three KSB strains of Pantoea agglomerans, Rahnella aquatilis and Pseudomonas orientalis on nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) uptake, nutrient use efficiency parameters and nutrients remobilization in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Pajohesh). The experiments included 15 treatments of KSB inoculations, commercial K biofertilizer and K chemical fertilizer. The results showed that the inoculums of all three KSB strains increased the K, N and P uptake by grain and straw, especially when applied in combination with ½ K chemical fertilizer (47.5 Kg/ha) as compared to the control treatment. The highest value of available K in the soil obtained from NPK chemical fertilizer equal to 140.1 and 134.6 mg K per kg of soil in the pot and field experiments, respectively, which were significantly higher than KSB inoculations treatments. Bacterial inoculums coupled with ½ K chemical fertilizer also enhanced the nutrient use efficiency (including agronomic efficiency (AE), apparent recovery efficiency (ARE), physiological efficiency (PE), agro-physiological efficiency (APE), internal utilization efficiency (UE), partial factor productivity (PFP), partial nutrient balance (PNB)) and nutrient remobilization. The results indicated that the bioinoculation with these KSB strains isolated from soil paddy could be considered as an effective way to increase potassium, nitrogen and phosphorus uptake by rice plant and enhance their use efficiency and remobilization to grains in the flooding irrigation conditions.

Restricted access