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Arsenic, the toxic metalloid, widely available in the natural ecosystem, poses serious problem through contaminated groundwater and drinking water. The emerging areas of arsenic hazards in agricultural systems through use of contaminated irrigation water and entry of toxin in crops has been largely overlooked. Arsenic accumulation by plants and its translocation to edible parts were observed to vary within crops and also across the cultivars. Wheat is an alternative choice of summer rice, due to low water requirement. With this background, the current experiment was conducted with four popular wheat cultivars to study the arsenic accumulation and varietal tolerance under different soils and groundwater. The arsenic content was determined by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Result revealed that, wheat cultivars differed in their grain arsenic concentration (0.23–1.22 mg kg−1), which differed across the sites and year of experiment. The arsenic translocation in wheat grains usually least, and accumulation by different tissues followed the order root > stem > leaf > grain across the cultivars. The cultivar UP-262 was found to accumulate least arsenic in grains and cultivar Kalyansona the highest under same growing condition, due to phyto-extraction or phyto-morphological potential of the varieties.

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Hoffman, S., Csitári, G., Balázs, J., Banko, J., Banko, L. 2005. Impact of straw manuring on soil organic matter dynamics and fertility. In: International Conference on the Role of Long-term Field Experiments in Agricultural and Ecological Sciences. Book

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Agbagla-Dohnani, A., Noziere, P., Clement, G., Doreau, M. 2001. In sacco degradability, chemical and morphological composition of 15 varieties of European rice straw. Anim. Feed Sci. Technol. 94 :15

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Rosely dos Reis Orsini, Elder Moscardini Filho, Lucildes Pita Mercuri, Jivaldo do Rosário Matos, and Fátima Maria Sequeira de Carvalho

]. Several works with the coffee straw has been studied in Brazil in order to add value to this residue [ 9 – 16 ]. Studies indicate that 55% of dried fruits represent the grains, 29% the pulp, 12% the bark, and 4% the mucilage. Therefore, 45% of

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Vajta, G., Holm, P., Kuwayama, M., Booth, P. J., Jacobsen, H., Greve, T. and Callesen, H. (1998): Open Pulled Straw (OPS) vitrification: a new way to reduce cryoinjuries of bovine ova and embryos. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 51 , 53

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Biofuels

Part II. Thermogravimetric research of dry decomposition

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Sławomir Poskrobko and Danuta Król

stalks, rice husk, rice straw, wheat straw. On the basis of TGA and DTG curves, we identified the division and the proportion of products for each kind of tested biomass, an interpretation of the process in terms of phase transformations occurring in the

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90 547 553 Chen, S., Lien, Y., Chen, H., Chao, K., Ho, H. and Yang, Y. (2000): Open pulled straws for vitrification of mouse mature oocytes

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, rice straw and preincubation on urea hydrolysis in wetland soil. International Rice Research Newsletter , 16 (2), 18. Bajwa M. S. Effect of sesbania, rice straw and

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Chen, S.Y., Zhang, X.Y., Pei, D., Sun, H.Y., Chen, S.L. 2007. Effects of straw mulching on soil temperature, evaporation and yield of winter wheat: field experiments on the North China Plain. An. Appl. Biol. 150 :261

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Chung, I. M., Kim, K. H., Ahn, J. K., Lee, S. B., Kim, S. H., Hahn, S. J. (2003): Comparison of allelopathic potential of rice leaves, straw and hull extracts on barnyard grass. Agron. J. , 95 , 1063

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