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. , Baloch Z. Investigation of the acid and sulfate resistance performances of hydrogen-rich water based mortars , Construction and Building Materials , Vol. 137 , 2017 , pp. 1 – 11 . [4

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2002 Middendorf, B. et al.: Investigative methods for the characterisation of historic mortars — Part 1: Mineralogical characterisation. Materials

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Introduction Characterization of masonry materials from historic structures typically involves petrographic analysis [ 1 , 2 ]. In the standard method for analysis of hardened masonry mortar, a combination of petrography and

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Introduction The chemical, mineralogical and structural characterisation of historic mortars can shed light to the provenance of raw materials and the technological practice, but can also help in the restoration and

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References [1] Gomes M. , Faria P. , Gonçalves T. ( 2018 ), Earth-based mortars for repair and protection of rammed earth walls

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compressive strength of cement mortars was also examined. This article is a continuation of our previously published studies [ 20 ] on cement pastes with described waste catalyst. Experimental Materials

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curves on heating. The standard cement pastes, mortars and concretes show generally less or more visible shrinkage on setting and hardening because the volume of formed hydrated phases is less than the volume of initial components. However, in

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Abstract  

The calcination of limestone is one of the oldest technical processes and it is still of actual interest. Very early calcitic mortars from Turkey have been investigated and compared with materials of other early civilisations i.e. with Egyptian mortars containing gypsum as well as medieval dolomite-based mortars from alpine regions. Contemporary calcination procedures, in particular the cement production, range among the most important global industrial processes causing non neglectable environmental problems. Sustainable, solar energy assisted calcination technologies and the conversion of product CO2 into useful commodities are discussed.

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Abstract  

Faraday induced the mechanochemical reduction of AgCl with Zn, Sn, Fe and Cu in 1820, using trituration in a mortar. This experiment is revisited, employing a mortar-and-pestle and a ball mill as mechanochemical reactors. The reaction kinetics depends both on the thermochemical properties and the hardness of the reactants. When using Zn as the reducing agent, Faraday likely observed a mechanically induced self-sustaining process (MSR), or at least he came very close to doing so.

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Abstract  

Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis was applied to the characterisation of the pozzolanic reaction in mortars containing the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) pitchstone fines (PF) and fly ash (FA) as partial replacements for Portland cement (PC). TG analysis was used to determine the proportion of calcium hydroxide (CH) present from the hydration of the PC based on the dehydroxylation of the CH present in the blended PC-SCM mortars. The consumption of CH indicated that both SCMs underwent the pozzolanic reaction and that PF was found to compare favourably in its pozzolanic reactivity of FA, the industry and globally accepted standard artificial pozzolan.

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