Search Results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 52 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All

, (1999–2001) Sikora S. — Redžepović S. 2003. Genotypic characterization of indigenous soybean rhizobia by PCR-RFLP of 16S rDNA, rep-PCR, rep-PCR and RAPD analysis. Food Technology and Biotechnology vol. 41 no. 1 61

Restricted access

Anaerobic infections are common and can cause diseases associated with severe morbidity, but are easily overlooked in clinical settings. Both the relatively small number of infections due to exogenous anaerobes and the much larger number of infections involving anaerobic species that are originally members of the normal flora, may lead to a life-threatening situation unless appropriate treatment is instituted. Special laboratory procedures are needed for the isolation, identification and susceptibility testing of this diverse group of bacteria. Since many anaerobes grow more slowly than the facultative or aerobic bacteria, and particularly since clinical specimens yielding anaerobic bacteria commonly contain several organisms and often very complex mixtures of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, considerable time may elapse before the laboratory is able to provide a final report. Species definition based on phenotypic features is often time-consuming and is not always easy to carry out. Molecular genetic methods may help in the everyday clinical microbiological practice in laboratories dealing with the diagnostics of anaerobic infections. Methods have been introduced for species diagnostics, such as 16S rRNA PCR-RFLP profile determination, which can help to distinguish species of Bacteroides, Prevotella, Actinomyces, etc. that are otherwise difficult to differentiate. The use of DNA-DNA hybridization and the sequencing of special regions of the 16S rRNA have revealed fundamental taxonomic changes among anaerobic bacteria. Some anaerobic bacteria are extremely slow growing or not cultivatable at all. To detect them in special infections involving flora changes due to oral malignancy or periodontitis, for instance, a PCR-based hybridization technique is used. Molecular methods have demonstrated the spread of specific resistance genes among the most important anaerobic bacteria, the members of the Bacteroides genus. Their detection and investigation of the IS elements involved in their expression may facilitate following of the spread of antibiotic resistance among anaerobic bacteria involved in infections and in the normal flora members. Molecular methods (a search for toxin genes and ribotyping) may promote a better understanding of the pathogenic features of some anaerobic infections, such as the nosocomial diarrhoea caused by C. difficile and its spread in the hospital environment and the community. The investigation of toxin production at a molecular level helps in the detection of new toxin types. This mini-review surveys some of the results obtained by our group and others using molecular genetic methods in anaerobic diagnostics.

Restricted access
Clinical and Experimental Medical Journal
Authors: Alajos Pár, Péter Kisfali, Béla Melegh, István Tornai, Judit Gervain, Ferenc Szalay, Márta Varga, Mária Papp, János Schuller, Anna Tusnádi, János Fehér, Gabriella Lengyel, Zsuzsanna Nemes, Zoltán Péterfi, Béla Hunyady, Áron Vincze, and Gabriella Pár

Abstract

Background

Since the clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection depends on the cytokines which are under genetic control, we have studied genetic polymorphisms of two pro-inflammatory interleukin-28B (IL-28B) (also named as interferon λ-3) and lymphotoxin-A (LT-A) as well as of one anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) genes in patients with HCV infection. We examined the allele frequencies of these genes in HCV patients as compared with healthy controls, and determined their association with sustained virological response (SVR) on PEG-IFN α-2a + ribavirin (RBV) (P/R) treatment, to assess the predictive value of these genetic variants. A total of 292 chronic HCV genotype 1 infected patients and 104 healthy controls have been studied. The samples were genotyped using PCR-RFLP and ABI Taqman genotyping assay.

Results

IL-28B — The C/C genotype in HCV patients occurred with lower frequency than in healthy controls (28.11% vs. 51.92%, p = 0.0001, OD 2.76), suggesting a protective role of this variant. At the same time, P/R treated patients with this C/C genotype achieved SVR at a higher rate, than those who have TT genotype (54.34% vs. 29.16%, p = 0.0447, OD 2.86). LT-A A252G — The frequency of A/A genotype did not differ between HCV patients and controls, but G/G homozygosity was found at a reduced rate in non-treated subgroup of HCV patients as compared to controls (2.91% vs. 9.90%, p = 0.041, OR 3.66). The G/G genotype seemed to be a predictor of SVR versus A/A genotype: SVR occurred in G/G pts 54.54% versus 44.94% in AA cases (not significant, NS). IL-10R 1087 — The G/G genotype in HCV patients occurred with lower frequency than in controls (37.15% vs. 52.74%, p = 0.00957, OD 1.89). G/G harboring patients showed higher SVR than patients with A/A genotypes (41.26% vs. 28.57%) (NS).

Conclusion

We have found that IL-28B C/C genotype was a protective genetic variant and a predictor of SVR in chronic HCV infection. Furthermore, our data suggest that presumable predictors may also be both IL-10 and LT-A gene polymorphisms; however, that needs to be confirmed by studies with a larger number of HCV patients.

Restricted access
Acta Agronomica Hungarica
Authors: Z. Jurković, K. Dugalić, M. Viljevac, I. Piližota, A. Vokurka, B. Puškar, and I. Pejić

. Sertkaya, G., Ulubas, C., Caglayan, K. (2003): Detection and characterisation of Plum pox potyvirus (PPV) by DAS-ELISA and RT-PCR/RFLP analysis in Turkey. Turk J. Agric. For. , 27 , 213–220. Caglayan K

Restricted access

Mirhendi, H., Makimura, K., Zomorodian, K., Yamada, T., Sugita, T. and Yamaguchi, H. (2005): A simple PCR-RFLP method for identification and differentiation of 11 Malassezia species. J. Microbiol. Methods 61 , 281

Restricted access
Acta Alimentaria
Authors: A. Csikos, A. Hodzic, E. Pasic-Juhas, A. Javor, A. Hrković-Porobija, T. Goletic, G. Gulyas, and L. Czegledi

PCR-RFLP techniques . Food Control , 18 , 1246 – 1249 . A MILLS , M. , F RANCINO , O. , J ANSA , M. & S ÁNCHEZ , A. ( 1997 ): Isolation of genomic DNA from milk samples by

Restricted access

289 294 Read, C.M., Monis, P.T., Thompson, R.C.A.: Discrimination of all genotypes of Giardia duodenalis at the glutamate dehydrogenase locus using PCR-RFLP. Infect Gen Evol 4

Restricted access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Mirna Brkljačić, Vesna Matijatko, Ivana Kiš, Nada Kučer, Jadranka Foršek, Renata Rafaj, Darko Grden, Marin Torti, Iva Mayer, and Vladimir Mrljak

81 638 642 Jefferies, R., Ryan, U. M. and Irwin, P. J. (2007): PCR-RFLP for the detection and differentiation of the canine piroplasm species and

Restricted access
Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors: Mojgan Karimi-Zarchi, Mansour Moghimi, Hajar Abbasi, Amaneh Hadadan, Razieh-Sadat Tabatabaei, Atiyeh Javaheri, and Hossein Neamatzadeh

four were hospital-based studies. One study in the present meta-analysis did not state the source of controls. Four genotyping methods were used, including AS-PCR, PCR-RFLP, Pyrosequencing TM , and TaqMan assay. The genotype distributions among the

Open access
Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors: Mojgan Karimi-Zarchi, Mansour Moghimi, Hajar Abbasi, Amaneh Hadadan, Razieh-Sadat Tabatabaei, Atiyeh Javaheri, and Hossein Neamatzadeh

hospital-based studies. One study in the present meta-analysis did not state the source of controls. Four genotyping methods were used, including AS-PCR, PCR-RFLP, Pyrosequencing TM , and TaqMan assay. The genotype distributions among the controls in two

Open access