Search Results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 782 items for :

  • "narrative" x
  • All content x
Clear All

INTRODUCTION Belief narratives or, according to Bascom ( Bascom 1965 :4), legends and charms, constitute two different folklore genres with distinctive characteristics, ways of transmission, performance and function. The study of their relation is

Open access

Abstract  

Egyptian narratives have undergone transformations due to ex/changes between cyber and book-bound texts. The publication of popular autobiographical narrative weblogs has aroused inquiries as to their literary status. This requires an examination of their reading processes as compared to avant-garde narratives in Arabic in order to verify the impact of media crossings and digitalization in promoting the hyper quality that subverts linearity in dominant discourse.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Using the Russian experience in World War II as an illustration, this article explores some dynamics of collective memory, especially when state authorities seek to employ a particular usable past. Posters, films, and other forms of popular culture are analyzed in an attempt to account for a sudden switch in official Soviet memory during the early phases of World War II. In this context the Soviet leadership reverted to relying on old Russian national narratives after spending years forcibly promulgating an internationalist, anti-nationalist official story. Along with other post-Soviet experience, this suggests that national narratives can be quite conservative and resistant to change. The notion of “schematic narrative templates” is employed to provide insight into how this played out in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia in general, with specific attention given to the “expulsion of foreign enemies” narrative template.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Our study draws on the array of functions assigned to the textual Coda in Ian McEwan’s novel Atonement, also turned into a successful movie. It follows two diverging narrative discourses—the Text and its Paratext—that overtly compete over the understanding of the story and over its reading transaction. In McEwan’s novel, the closing Paratext provides genre patterns and alternative reading strategies to the Text. Turning back upon the story itself and upon its process of writing, its understanding and its genre expectations in a particular cultural context, Coda is being assigned by the British novelist an overt meta-narrative task.

Restricted access

This paper delineates critical approaches to the reading of the Szindbád narratives by Hungarian author Gyula Krúdy, which basically have tended to assume a balance of the sensual and the spiritual, as well as literal and figurative meanings. I propose an interpretative model focusing on the question as to how an imaginary event exists in the consciousness of a literary character, and how that character’s perception can be related in the narrative. There is not much on this short-fiction poetical issue in the secondary literature, much as there is very little on notions of overlaps between reality and fiction or the transformative text-events of becoming a creation.

Restricted access

Dating probably from the 6th century, this work relates the story of the conversion of Xanthippe and Polyxene, but the plot took place much earlier, at the time of the apostles. Four of them actually figure in the story, including among others St Paul. The anonymous author clearly follows the literary tradition of the apocryphal acts of the apostles. On the other hand, however, he was deeply influenced by another form of art, namely by the lives of saints. Consequently, the apostles are relegated into the background in the story, and the author concentrates above all on Xanthippe and Polyxene, that is, instead of the evangelists on the mental and psychological process of the conversion of the would-be Christians. And since it is very doubtful, whether his heroines ever existed, he employs the narrative methods and devices he found in ancient fiction, in the pagan romances or Christian novels.

Restricted access

concerns warrant further research to achieve clarity and resolution. The present narrative review aimed to collect, summarize, and discuss the various concerns, debate, and research on these diagnostic criteria, using a dimensional approach, to help mental

Open access

One of the main characteristics of feminine literary texts from black Africa is the dominant use of the first person as a narrative instance of the story. In this work we will try to show how the homodiegetic narrative of the first texts of women writers offers a series of specific features that refer, on the one hand, to the plural value of the use of the first person in non-fiction texts, and, on the other hand, to the introduction, in fiction texts, of new mechanisms of gender identification as polyphony or dialogic communication between women.

Restricted access

Abstract  

The article focuses on Native American Michael Dorris and Louise Erdrich’s novel The Crown of Columbus, which contemplates the dilemma of how to/whether to celebrate the quincentenary of America’s discovery. Putting a face on Columbus and coming to terms with the consequences of his voyages to the “New World” from Native and White perspectives alike — the main concern of the novel — makes characters and readers weigh issues of stereotyping, mimicry, and historical thinking. The article analyzes how a Bakhtinian dialogue among narrative voices over these notions generates a postcolonial discourse that seeks tolerance and mutual understanding among races cursed with a history of miscommunication.

Restricted access

The embedded narrative of Adrastus (Stat. Theb. 1. 577–668) is full of verbal repetition and is echoed in later parts of the epic, especially the Nemean episode (Theb. 4–6). This paper investigates these intratextual parallels and tries to pin down the effects of these echoes. The verbal repetition highlights motifs that play an important role in the Thebaid as a whole and connects characters, events, motifs and episodes. This intratextuality sometimes creates unity, sometimes — contrarily — discontinuity or ambiguity. This article is a case study of Statius’ intratextual poetics, a field that has thus far received little attention in scholarship on the Thebaid.

Restricted access