Search Results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 292 items for :

  • "phonology" x
  • All content x
Clear All

regional Vulgar Latin samples don’t include the data from the provinces of the Alps- Danube-Adria region. 10 See Tamás (n. 6) 66-68, or Herman, J.: Vulgar Latin . Pennsylvania State University Press 2000, 45-47, and Loporcaro, M.: Phonological Processes

Open access

This paper intends to investigate Greek influence on the Latin sound change [b] > [β] suggested occasionally in the literature by surveying not only the relevant linguistic data of Latin/Romance and Koine/Modern Greek but also the relevant literature and by involving and analyzing data sets recorded from 18 Roman provinces and the city of Rome in the Computerized Historical Linguistic Database of the Latin Inscriptions of the Imperial Age (cf. http://lldb.elte.hu/) by a more differentiated phonological approach considering external sandhi rules and in a chronological distribution more detailed than any applied before. In the end, the influence of Greek has been evidenced at least for some areas and especially for the early period (1st–3rd century AD), which is more important in this respect than the late period (4th–6th century AD), since then the merger can also be explained by developments in Latin itself beside a supposed external influence.

Restricted access

. Rate effects on Swedish VOT: Evidence for phonological overspecification . Journal of Phonetics 39 . 39 – 49 . Beckman , Jill , Michael Jessen and Catherine O. Ringen . 2013 . Empirical evidence for laryngeal features: aspirating vs

Full access

The central motif of Iván Fónagy’s “extra-vagant” linguistics — in terms of his own metaphor — was the idea of “languages within language”: the issue of mapping the ontogenesis of language onto a particular language of the present. In other words: what is the consistent ontogenetic interpretation of a given fact of language? In his oeuvre, the inventively documented solution to that problem is the theory of “double encoding”: the claim that, after being linguistically encoded, a linguistic expression goes through a second encoding phase during implementation in which it gets saturated by supplementary aspects of content. The latter are imprints of ancient gestures in language. On the other hand, the mechanism is also the source of the historical emergence of demotivated linguistic signs. The application of the principle not only makes it possible to resolve intricate problems in theoretical linguistics but also to explain remotivation in poetic language and to use it as a tool in stylistic analysis.

Full access

– 50 . Anderson , John and Colin J . Ewen. 1987 . Principles of Dependency Phonology . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press . Backley , Phillip . 2011 . An introduction to Element Theory . Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press

Full access

References Anderson , Stephen R. 1974 . The organization of phonology . New York : Academic Press . Archangeli , Diana . 1985 . Yokuts harmony: Evidence for coplanar representation in nonlinear phonology . Linguistic Inquiry 16

Full access

by a DFG grant to the project ‘Featural Affixes: The Morphology of Phonological Features’ (TR 521/6–1). References Alexander , Ruth María . 1980 . Gramática Mixteca de Atatlàhuca. Verano : Instituto Lingüístico de Verano

Full access

1999 Nespor, Marina and Irene Vogel. 1986. Prosodic phonology. Dordrecht: Foris. Vogel I

Open access

Clements, George N. — Engin Sezer 1982. Vowel and consonant disharmony in Turkish. In: Harry van der Hulst — Norval Smith (eds): The structure of phonological representations, part II, 213–255. Foris, Dordrecht, Cinnaminson

Full access

. , & FRANCIS , D. J. ( 2005 ). Development of phonological awareness . Current Directions in Psychological Science , 14 ( 5 ), 255 – 259 . BLOMERT , L

Restricted access