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The Vetus Latina (VL) Bible, whose North African origins date to the turn of the 3rd century, provides precious documentation of vocabulary chosen for use in the Latinspeaking Christian community. While it is true that this translation literature

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sens étymologique du terme : entre les années 381–384, Égérie s’est rendue en Terre Sainte Bible en main, elle a visité les sites bibliques, puis en Mésopotamie, à Antioche et enfin à Constantinople, où elle a rédigé le récit de sa pérégrination. Ces

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The purpose of this analysis is to present the manner of translating the titles of holy books from Hebrew, Greek, and Arabic by Polish and Lithuanian Tartars and by Polish translators of the Bible and the Quran. It also attempts to define the scope and the nature of relations between the translations of the Bible and the Quran and to present the picture of the books in question on the basis of selected source texts. The source texts vary in terms of form and origin and the vocabulary was excerpted from such materials as historical writings of the Polish and Lithuanian Tartars (the texts were written in Arabic and required transcription and transliteration) as well as translations of the Quran into Polish. The words were also selected from the translations of the Bible (16th-century, 17th-century, and contemporary versions).

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királyi várpalota kápolnája , Pest , 1862 . Komada 2000 Komada , Akiko : Les illustrations de la Bible historiale

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Acta Orientalia Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Authors: Imre Galambos, Gergely Salát, Csaba Prutkay, Imre Hamar, Péter Vámos, and Anna Pikó

Xixing, Lu: 'Shijing' yiwen yanjiu (The Study of Textual Variants of the Shijing) Hamar, Imre: A Religious Leader in the Tang: Chengguan's Biography Qian, Nanxiu: Spirit and Self in Medieval China. The Shih-shuo hsin-yü and Its Legacy Chen, Jinhua: Making and Remaking History. A Study of Tiantai Sectarian Historiography Nozaki, Akira-Baker, Chris (eds): Village Communities, State and Traders. Essays in Honour of Chatthip Nartsupha Gottfried von Laimbeckhoven SJ (1707-1787) Der Bischof von Nanjing und seine Briefe aus China mit Faksimile seiner Reisebeschreibung. Transkribiert und bearbeitet von Stephan Puhl (1941-1997), und Sigismund Freiherr von Elverfeldt-Ulm unter Mitwirkung von Gerhard Zeilinger. Zum Druck vorbereitet und herausgegeben von Roman Malek SVD Zetzsche, Jost Oliver: The Bible in China: The History of the Union Version or The Culmination of Protestant Missionary Bible Translation in China Xinran: The Good Women of China. Hidden Voices. Translated by Esther Tyldesley

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This paper analyzes the spiritual background of the Mura Region Slovenian priest Števan Küzmič’a (1723–1779) oeuvre, especially the circumstances and sources of his translation of the Bible, looking for the answer if he really translated the New Testament from Greek as it is stated in the title. Hungarian Calvinists were provided with two translations of the Bible when the Slovenian version was made, thanks to György Bárány and János Szabó Sartorius. The structure, content and message of the forewords written by József Torkos to Števan Küzmič’s Slovenian and András Torkos’s Hungarian translation of the Bible is similar. In Küzmič’s case the use of Hungarian patterns can be proved by borrowings from Hungarian, word formation based on Hungarian models as well as Hungarian governments and idioms. Števan Küzmič aimed at the purity of the Mura Region language but he had to borrow also from other languages to translate the complex Biblical text properly. He created a great work for Slovenians, raising the Mura Region Slovenian onto the level of a standard language.

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The present paper deals with the functioning of phraseological comparative constructions with biblical characters in dialects of East, West, and South Slavic languages. The charac- ters of the Holy Scripture include not only the nameless and named heroes of the Bible but also the Creator himself as well as supernatural beings that serve or oppose the Creator. The description involves comparative phraseological units with an adjective that derives from a character of the Bible. Most of the analyzed Slavic dialectal phraseological units are fixed in dictionaries.

The description of comparative phraseological units (if possible) is carried out from the positions of structural and semantic modelling, which allows to identify the lexical variation of components in the dialects of the same language or in various languages. In some cases, the paper includes areal characteristics of comparative constructions. For this purpose, the author shows their parallels in other linguistic and dialect regions. As a result, the paper reveals both structural and semantic biblical universals and phraseological units with national specificity, i.e. similes that have no equivalents (literary or non-Slavic). There are units that are specific for some regions, for example, phraseological units containing microtoponyms such as geographical objects that are not widely known. The national and regional identity is manifested both at the level of figurative basis and at the level of non- equivalent comparativism since some subjects can be active in one language, while they are peripheral or lacunary in another one.

In some cases, phraseological units are provided with cultural, historical, and etymol- ogical comments which reveal not only the biblical and religious roots but also reflect the ancient mythological representations of the Slavs. The author gives an explanation to the meaning of similes and their components.

The Old and New Testaments are a common element of the spiritual culture of Chris- tians so the comparison reveals the similarity and repetition of comparative units, directly or indirectly related to the names of the characters of the Bible, or structural and semantic models in a particular area. At the same time, the phraseological units genetically ascending to the Bible show a quite large differentiation, demonstrating the peculiarity of the recep- tion of biblical images by the Slavs, the unequal interest in them. Although the very name of the biblical character is often international, set similes containing it are not always the same. This is usually the case for pseudo-biblical phraseological units that have no direct links to the character of the Bible; they are usually inherent in folk speech and are often jokingly ironic. This is particularly evident in dialects.

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In every European language we find a great number of phraseological units of biblical origin, but each language has its own peculiarities in adopting these units. At the same time the text of the Bible has its own phraseological system too, which is obviously different from the systems inherited by the European languages. This approach gives us the way to obtain relevant results in diachronic research. The practical application of this method is presented in the analysis of the origin of the idiom under the open sky .

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I collected stories of conversion from university students in Kolozsvár/Cluj. They had come into contact with representatives of the revival movement and constructed their own identities under the influence of the identity patterns conveyed by these people. The conversion means that their relationship with God becomes personal in that they accept salvation from sin for themselves, declare themselves to be the children of God and place their lives under His guidance. This goes together with a new way of life involving daily reading and interpretation of the Bible, impromptu personal prayers and participation in charity work. In the stories of conversion they speak about this new identity and the process through which they changed their identities. Parallel with the restructuring of the individual identity the collective identity also changes since, from the time of their conversion, they regard themselves as members of the community and the activity of the community extends to all fields of life: Bible hours, religious services, sports, summer camps, film club, etc.

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