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mortality in Philadelphia associated with daily air pollution concentrations. Am. Rev. Respir. Dis., 1992, 145 , 600–604. Dockery D. W. Increased mortality in Philadelphia associated with

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: G. Rácz, M. Alam, Ch. Arekatte, K. Albert, N. Papp, É. Stefanovits-Bányai, P. Russo, M. DiMatteo, and Gy. Vatai

Alves , V.D. & Coelhoso , I.M. (2006): Orange juice concentration by osmotic evaporation and membrane distillation: A comparative study. J. Food Eng. , 74 (1) , 125

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: V. Tomović, Lj. Petrović, M. Jokanović, M. Tomović, Ž. Kevrešan, T. Tasić, P. Ikonić, B. Šojić, S. Škaljac, and M. Šošo

Tomović, V.M., Petrović, Lj.S., Tomović, M.S., KevreŠan, ž.S., Jokanović, M.R., Džinić, N.R. & Despotović, A.R. (2011c): Cadmium concentration of the liver in ten different pig genetic lines from Vojvodina, Serbia. Fd Addit. Contam. B , 4 , 180

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Berges, R., Rott, M. and Seemüller, E. (2000): Range of phytoplasma concentrations in various plant hosts as determined by competitive polymerase chain reaction. Phytopathology 90, 1145–1152. Range of phytoplasma concentrations

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Abstract  

A method is proposed by which the significance of the differences between trace element concentrations of sample and control can be estimated without detailed knowledge of the distribution in the total population. Both sample and control are cut in half and the trace element concentrations of all four pieces are determined. The concentration values of the two halves of each sample are compared with each other and so are the concentration values of the two samples. This cross-comparison is essentially the application of Student's t-test to the smallest possible number of data. The calculation is reduced to a simple formula, and tables of confidence limits are not needed. The implications of lack of general background knowledge are discussed. Since it cannot always be known whether a certain trace element follows a normal or log-normal distribution pattern, or whether simultaneously determined concentrations of several trace elements are correlated with each other, the most cautious estimate of the significance is recommended.

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Kalayci, M., Torun, B., Eker, S., Aydin, M., Ozturk, L., Cakmak, I. 1999. Grain yield, zinc efficiency and zinc concentration of wheat cultivars grown in a zinc-deficiency calcareous soil in field and greenhouse. Field Crops Res. 63 :87

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., Schnug, E., Haneklaus, S., Simic, D. (1997): Genetic and environmental influences on micronutrients concentrations in maize ( Zea mays L.) plants. pp. 209–214. In: van Cleemput, O., Haneklaus, S., Hofman, G., Schnug, E., Vermoesen, A. (eds

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285 290 Dykyjová, D. (1979): Selective uptake of mineral ions and their concentration factors in aquatic higher plants. - Folia Geobot. Phytotax. 14 : 267

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. Badakhshan , H. , Moradi , N. , Mohammadzadeh , H. , Zakeri , M.R. 2013 . Genetic variability analysis of grains Fe, Zn and beta-carotene concentration of prevalent wheat varieties in Iran . Int. J. Agr. Crop. Sci. 6 : 57 – 62

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Abstract  

Rice plants were grown in an experimental field and separated at harvest into different components, including polished rice, rice bran, hull, straw and root. The distribution of chlorine in these components was determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The concentration of chlorine in the roots was the highest (4800 mg·kg−1 dry wt.) and that in the polished rice was the lowest (140 mg·kg−1 dry wt.) among the plant components. The content of chlorine in the polished rice was about 2% of the entire plant, and the rest was present in the inedible portions; about 75% of the total chlorine content was in the straw. The percentage of chlorine removed from the surface soil layer to the above ground biomass of the rice plants was calculated as 5% every year. The chlorine concentrations in leaf blades of different positions collected from four growing stages varied by more than one order of magnitude, and were well correlated with the sum concentrations of major cations (potassium + calcium + magnesium). This may be attributed to the fact that the translocation rate of chlorine among the leaf blades with age depends on the concentrations of the major cations.

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