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In this paper, I establish a connection between the manifold character of Fama as reported by Virgil in Aen. 4. 173 ff. and her ‘manifold speech’ (multiplex sermo) in the framework of a narratological reading. According to my interpretation, the short fama of the Virgilian Fama (4. 191-194), as a spectacular example of ‘polyphonic narrative’, radicalises and thus domesticates the dangers inherent in the epic discourse itself.

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This article examines the practical function of a group of epic songs. On the basis of local folk ballads (ballade populaire), it shows that the epic songs preserve local history and recall members of the community and events of their lives. The songs in part function as a record of memory, as a means of prompting memory, and in part they serve to marginalise members of the local community. The author examined songs written for funerals which contain biographic data of the deceased person. The function of the songs is to bid farewell and preserve the memory of the deceased and popularise him or her, and to preserve the cult of the dead. In the 18th century the verses bidding farewell to the dead were part of the official church funeral and were written by the priest or cantor. From the 19th century the church rejected these farewells in verse. From then on the epic songs bidding farewell to the dead were written by lay persons. At the end of the 20th century the church banned the singing of such farewells at funerals.

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By analyzing enunciation in performance, this article shows the similarities among funeral laments, epic songs, exile songs and the playing of the duduk (oboe). Regarded as “words on” (kilamê ser), these four types of enunciation share melodic, metric, gestural and emotional elements. According to local typologies, the “words on” are opposed to songs (stran), a term referring mostly to wedding music and the zurna (oboe). The opposition between word and song is also related to a series of antinomic couples, such as exile vs. household, sadness vs. joy, or duduk vs. zurna. An analysis of these music and enunciation typologies of emotion allows an approach to Yezidi ritual and calendar time.

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In the article, the author examines the characteristic features of epic fairy-tale of the two largest ethnic groups of Ukrainian Carpathians, i.e. Ukrainians and Hungarians. The folklore of the region has its own peculiarities. The natural and geographical features of the region, trades and crafts, in particular shepherd culture, historical events, entrance to different states are represented in the folklore. At the same time, the fairy-tale tradition of the region has its own ethnolocal specification, includes various linguistic and folklore dialects, the emergence of which was also influenced by other ethnic (Hungarian, Polish, Romanian, Slovakian, Gypsy, etc.) borrowings which were adapted to withstand local forms.

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The author suggests new etymologies for two well-known Old Russian proper names. The god name of Simarĭglŭ/Semarĭglŭ is loaned from East Iranic (Scytho-Sarmatian) of the Alanic Caucasian period and corresponds to Ossetic xī/xe ‘oneself’ and maræg ‘murderer; killing’, xemaræg ‘suicide (person)’ and the Russian participle suffix -l-. The motive of god’s suicide is extended in mythology, including the Nart epic. The ethnonym Khinova mentioned in “The Tale of Igor’s campaign“ is of Baltic origin and comes from IE *skū-n- ‘asylum, shelter; shield, etc.’ and the suffix -ava/-uva, very frequent in the Baltic ethnonymics.

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Satire 4 is one of the most-criticized poems of Juvenal. Because of its structural problems, certain scholars have even casted doubts on its unity considering it as two fragments patched together by a later editor. The key to understand the satire’s structure is the connection between its two main parts and the central figures thereof, Crispinus and Domitian. Apart from the structural problems, this paper also deals with certain features of the mock-epic as well as the targets of the invective.

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The language of Romanian oral poetry, especially that of narrative genres like winter-solstice songs (colinde) and epic songs (cîntece batrînesti), is marked by a large number of lexical and morphological archaisms. In this paper we analyse some lexical items (mohorît, pelita, a se nadai, a se mîneca, etc.) and a morphological phenomenon (the inversion of the auxiliary and the participle), to point out the relationship between the folk texts and the most ancient documents of Romanian (principally religious texts of the 16th and 17th century).

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The article analyzes a simile of the Panegyric on the emperor Avitus by the Late Antique poet Sidonius Apollinaris (430–486 CE). The Vandals who sacked Rome in 455 become terrible wolves. Sidonius has to exaggerate the drama of the event experienced by Rome in order to exalt the salvific role played by the emperor Avitus. Sidonius echoes a lot of Vergil’s pastoral landscapes and other epic similes or phrases by Statius, Silius, Valerius Flaccus, Lucan. This simile is a good example of the poetry of Sidonius and of the literary conceptions of the Late Antique Literature.

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The embedded narrative of Adrastus (Stat. Theb. 1. 577–668) is full of verbal repetition and is echoed in later parts of the epic, especially the Nemean episode (Theb. 4–6). This paper investigates these intratextual parallels and tries to pin down the effects of these echoes. The verbal repetition highlights motifs that play an important role in the Thebaid as a whole and connects characters, events, motifs and episodes. This intratextuality sometimes creates unity, sometimes — contrarily — discontinuity or ambiguity. This article is a case study of Statius’ intratextual poetics, a field that has thus far received little attention in scholarship on the Thebaid.

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The phenomenon of retranslation may be accounted for in a number of ways. Some of the commonly mentioned factors are: the ageing of the existing translation(s), the necessity to introduce corrections or improvements, and commercial reasons, too. Some case studies show that other factors can lead to retranslation, namely those resulting from the needs of the target culture. The present paper offers yet another possible explantion. The case of several French renditions of the Polish national epic "Pan Tadeusz" (1834) by Adam Mickiewicz, shows that the needs of the original culture can also motivate retranslation.

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