Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 78 items for :

  • "intertextuality" x
  • All content x
Clear All

The paper, as its title-Hamlet and Don Quixote in the intertextual poetic world of Turgenev's novel, Rudin-suggests, attempts at elucidating the Hamlet and Don Quixote problematics from a poetic point of view. This approach refuses to rely on the analysis of Turgenev's interpretation of the figures of Hamlet and Don Quixote as presented in the writer's essay Hamlet and Don Quixote. Instead, it proposes a close reading of the Rudin-Hamlet and Rudin-Don Quixote intertexts evolving in the Turgenevian novel under scrutiny, with special attention to the common aspects of their poetic formulation. These poetic analogues lead to a parallel intertextual portraying of Hamlet and Don Quixote as semantically attached to the figure of Rudin. The interpretation of the Hamlet-intertext places at center stage the Mouse-trap scene in its relation to the descriptions of the appearance of the Ghost at the beginning of the play and Hamlets's revenge at its end, with the semantic implications of their motifs of word and deed. The analysis gets to the conclusion of a semantic kinship between Rudin-Hamlet and Rudin-Quixote formed in the two entwined intertexts with a dominance of the motif of the freedom of artistic creation. The theoretical dimension of the reading touches upon the problematics of mirroring, reflecting and-in a broader sense-representation.

Restricted access

Is it still possible to renew the novelistic form? One of the young authors published by Minuit, Eric Laurrent shows that such an enterprise is a not as hopeless as it might seem. Laurrent sets his novel in the genre of the spy novel and hence establishes a communication with the reader deceiving all his expectations. On the one hand, this exaggerated intertextual fullness shows the narrative as an artifical product so as to keep the reader at a certain distance from the fiction. On the other hand, using a series of discours transcending our everyday life, the novel gathers the scattered fragments of the contemporary world. Doing this, it obeys a postmodern aesthetcs which, unlike the modernity, doesn't try to provide an answer to the chaos but integrates it.

Restricted access

This article explores the symbiotic relationship between nature and poetry, which is in many ways pivotal for Vergil’s Arcadia, as an imaginary construct. Interdependence of the ideal landscape and the poetic creativity finds an especially refined and polysemic expression in the fagus, which functions in the Eclogues simultaneously as a literary image, a metaphor, and a symbol. It is also strongly reminiscent of the proto-idyllic segment of Plato’s Phaedrus (230b-e), describing a beautiful πλάτανος that turns out to be the source of anagogic inspiration. Based on this analogy, a comparative reading of Plato’s dialogue and Vergil’s idyllic poems is offered, and the ascensus motive of Eclogue 5 reveals the Platonic echoes. The anagogic aspect of Arcadia is examined from an intertextual and interdisciplinary point of view, hopefully contributing to seize the polyphonic complexity of Vergil’s poetics.

Restricted access

In the present paper I intend to give a survey on the chronological problems of the Eclogues by Baptista Mantuanus, on their historical background, on the activity of the popes during the lifetime of Baptista, on his career in the church that gives the grounds for his sharp criticism on the moral of the popes as well as of the church. After surveying these problems I focus on the most critical 9th Eclogue by Baptista examining the Virgilian parallels and allusions, the structure of the Eclogue and the mutual influence of the medieval and humanistic way of thinking in the poem showing Virgilian and Hildebertian intertextuality, with the conclusion that humanistic and theological traditions are unified in the poem.

Restricted access

The messenger speeches in some of Seneca's tragedies (the most extensive ones can be read in Agamemnon and Hercules Furens) constitute special epic details of the works. Their narrative technique, intertextual references and representation of time link them not with the dramatic literary form, but with the epic one, and Vergil's Aeneid is, beyond any doubt, their most important 'hypertextus'. The setting of the messenger reports has not been subordinated to the dramatic efficacy of the main conflict, they produce rather a generic multiplicity. The reform of closed literary forms and the generic heterogeneity are not unique phenomena in the literary life of this period; the meaning and importance of the innovation made by Seneca cannot be judged separately from the most important literary achievements of the period: Luc an's Bellum Civile and Petronius' Satyricon

Restricted access

In the works of Nabokov there is a combination of scryptography of symbols that the writer uses in an ambivalent way-playing with them (in the high, psychologic sense of the play also as ritual) and exploiting them as polygenetic symbols with different referent sources (Jewish Bible, Egypt, New Testament, antiquity, Dante, Cabala, alchemy, freemasonry). The article shows in a parallel investigation of the Russian and the English texts of the short story how the fantastique way from a museum in France to the native town of the hero, to Russia, due to the broad variety of intertextual allusions, motives and invariants of Nabokov's oeuvre can be understood as a ritual transition through the “underworld” to an “other world”.

Restricted access

Abstract  

In this paper I would like to examine a rather special kind of irony that could be justly called 'comparative irony'. What I have in mind is the case when an author, in order to show the worthlessness of his own age, juxtaposes some well-known cultural values of the past with their obviously less valuable present-time equivalents. My examples, the two works that I would like to compare from this point of view, were created almost at the same time, in the same cultural milieu, by very close acquaintances, and with very different results. I will compare T. S. Eliot's masterpiece, The Waste Land with Ezra Pound's less known Hugh Selwyn Mauberley, and especially their different intertextual uses of the same locus from the Divina Commedia.

Restricted access

Abstract  

The phenomenon of the German Wende of 1989 has elicited various responses, both literary and otherwise. Especially illuminating are those of the twoauthors Volker Braun and Hans Magnus Enzensberger, arguably the leading poetsin former East and West Germany, respectively. Braun’s “O Chicago!O Widerspruch!” and Enzensberger’s “Aufbruchsstimmung” concur inthat they voice criticism and serious doubts concerning German reunificationand what it entails, whereas the two writers differ markedly, with one exceptionperhaps, in their commitment to international, indeed global, problems andevents, as witness the remaining three poems. The discussion of these threetexts is supplemented by a brief look at the concomitant prose publicationsof Braun and Enzensberger; also, general questions of intertextuality andthe translatability thereof are discussed, if only in passing.

Restricted access

Le rapprochement de la Littérature Comparée et de la Littérature pour enfants

Le cas exemplaire des contes de fées: leur survivance dans la culture moderne du texte et de l’image

Neohelicon
Author: Meni Kanatsouli

Abstract  

Although theory and criticism of children’s literature has greatly evolved up to the present day, the transfer of comparative literary theory to the domain of children’s literature has not been nearly as promising. Recently, however, Emer O’sullivan’s study broadened our scope of knowledge in the domain of children’s literature by proposing a theoretical plan that consists in transferring and applying the principles of comparative literature to texts intended for children. In my article, I will attempt to test some of these theoretical systems by applying them to fairy tales, and more specifically, their modern adaptations: comparative poetics, intertextual and image studies along with studies in other comparative fields.

Restricted access

Abstract  

To examine the dynamics of incompletion that characterizes many writings by twentieth century authors, the following essay investigates the possibilities to visualize (1) switches, (2) shuffles and (3) shifts in modern multilingual manuscripts with digital philological tools. (1) Jerome McGann’s notions of the bibliographical and the linguistic codes were originally not coined in relation to manuscript studies, but they can be applied to a particular form of “code switching” between an image-based and a text-based approach. (2) Another phenomenon that typically marks the writing process of literary texts is the practice of shuffling textual segments when their definitive position has not yet been fixed. (3) Finally, transtextual shifts in multilingual manuscripts are not only limited to intertextual references, but often have a language-related dimension as well.

Restricted access